Switch to English Language Passer en langue franηaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,694   Posts: 1,482,487   Online: 967
      
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 81
  1. #51

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,522
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Does anyone mix the t-grain developers like DD-X or Tmax? I know they are "proprietary formulas" but has anyone figured them out yet?
    There is Crawley's FX-37 which was developed for T-Max and Delta grain films.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #52
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,130
    Images
    210

    if you mix your own chemistry from raw chemicals

    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    Ilford recommend DD-X for all of their films. It is not specific to the Delta / TMAx films.
    I'm asking if anyone knows the formulas not what film they are paired with


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #53
    BradS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    S.F. Bay Area, California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,921
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I'm asking if anyone knows the formulas not what film they are paired with
    ~Stone


    Yes, I understand what you're asking but "the t-grain developers like DD-X" implies that DD-X is specific to "t-grain"...which it is not. I was just trying to disabuse you of the notion that DD-X was somehow specific to t-grain [films] because it certainly is not. I don't know enough about TMax developer to comment on it. Bottom line is thatDD-X is a modern developer that is well suited to just about any modern B&W film...not just Delta and TMax.

  4. #54
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,130
    Images
    210

    if you mix your own chemistry from raw chemicals

    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    Yes, I understand what you're asking but "the t-grain developers like DD-X" implies that DD-X is specific to "t-grain"...which it is not. I was just trying to disabuse you of the notion that DD-X was somehow specific to t-grain [films] because it certainly is not. I don't know enough about TMax developer to comment on it. Bottom line is thatDD-X is a modern developer that is well suited to just about any modern B&W film...not just Delta and TMax.
    Gotcha, thanks for the info, it's always good to hear affirmation.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #55

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    137
    I mix my own chemicals because:

    1. CONTROL
    I can tweak the formula to fit my needs. E.g. if I mix Amidol paper developer I can add a little bit extra of Kbr (Potassium Bromide) to make the image warmer looking. Or when mixing ABC Pyro film developer I can add some extra Sodium Carbonate to speed up development. This is useful when I need push more contrast.

    2. ECONOMY
    Especially for the formulas I use, there are big savings mixing it oneself. Another point is that I can mix exactly the amount I need, not needing to have bottles of unused chemistry on the shelf for too long!

    3. FUN
    I like the feeling of being able to mix everything myself, gives me some self-confidence in what I am doing, even If I'm far away from being an expert.

    I actually mix everything from raw now: film developer, paper developer, stop bath and fixer. I will also in the future mix hypo clearing agent as well!

  6. #56
    c6h6o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,137
    Images
    6
    Most of my photography involves contact printing on silver chloride papers and my preferred film developer is ABC pyro, which to my knowledge is not available premixed. Ditto the amidol formula I use for printing and the fixer (2 bath plain hypo, with sodium metabisulfite added to the first bath). Although they're all available as kits, I find it far less expensive to just keep a supply of the raw chemicals and mix them ad hoc.

    I don't mix my own because it gives me any particular advantage. It's just that they're not available premixed or are prohibitively expensive premixed. When I develop negatives I intend to enlarge I usually use Defender 777, which is only available as a kit of pre-measured powders (when it's available, which it doesn't seem to be at present).
    Jim

  7. #57
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    I started DIY mixing when I got back into my own colour processing after an 8 year hiatus.
    4 years in a small apartment when first married saving towards a house and the darkroom gear all stuffed into a storage closet, instead of being used in the basement darkroom of a shared house I had owned with two other guys.

    Then 4 years living in Australia with all my darkroom gear left packed up in my parent basement.
    Finally back in Canada, but now with two young kids as part of the fold.

    I knew from prior forays into colour in the old ep/2 world that the chemistry kit in a box route to printing on your own meant mixing the kit and using it over a few weeks of printing like mad before the chemistry pooped out.

    So I ordered a starting batch of raw chemistry stuff from Johnnie at JD Photochem.

    Then I contunued to built up and broaden my stock with orders from Mike at Artcraft, and some Formualry orders, and later Claire when she took over from Johnnie.
    I do dearly miss the great service JD offered me.

    With raw chems at hand:
    I could mix a litre or half a litre of c-41 and process the films at hand, with fresh chems to suit the backlog.
    I could mix a litre of RA-4, and process in tube, and know that if I did not finish the litre, the left overs poured away at the end of a day or two only were a small loss, not $40 or more like kit quanities gone off of the past.

    Only when a roller processor landed in my lap for what I consider a great deal did I look to to buying kit based Kodak RA-RT chemistry.
    My home brew RA developer oxidized in no time in the roller tank.

    I have also mixed from scratch for E-6, and also use pre mixed 6 step E-6 from the cast offs of a photo processor who abandon slide processing.

    By then I then found I had the lion's share of what was needed to diy mix my b&w chemistry of all sorts as well.
    Some times I will 'dip a toe in' to try a mix, and then order the whole kit from the formulary. The try before a big buy is what I like with DIY mixing.

    It is also nice to know that if I will be away from the darkroom ( I have a busy professional and family life), DIY gets me on my feet in almost no time.
    It is just a matter of one night to mix fresh chems and the next night I am priniting or processing a backlog of films with chems that I know have not gone dodgy from sitting unused , or worse yet, partially used for some months. Too many past brown liquid in part used bottles of Ilford Multigrade developer no more.

    I do have lots of commercial mixes that land on me as I buy up darkroom lots , and use them when still vailble.

    I do a lot of cooking food from scratch, put up preserves for winter, make my own soaps from lye and fats, and also make some of our own wine and vodka, so diy photo chemistry is just one more thing to mix up to put into usable form.

    Alt process curiousity is another factor.
    If I am sizing and coating my own paper, then why not diy formulate my own developer to suit the needs of the project at hand?
    my real name, imagine that.

  8. #58

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Ukraine - Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    303
    Do you have a good recept for Vodka?
    My favorite store: http://www.fotohuisrovo.nl

  9. #59
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by Роберт View Post
    Do you have a good recept for Vodka?
    All general wine making sterilization and rinsing and washing of equipment rules apply.

    Specialist high alcohol content tolerant yeast strains and refined sugar based mash gets me close to 18% after fermentation stops, per my hygrometer.
    Sugar amount is on the yeast packet I buy (about 6kg per 20L I think).
    Add sugar and stir to fully dissolve in hot water and let mix cool somewhat in a wine primary fermenter pail before adding yeast, or the little buggers will be killed before they do their heavenly work.
    Keep warm as per wine making, till the bubbling in the air lock dies off.
    I then decant off the supernatant carefully to leave the lees (although in truth quite small lees, less than with grapes, when refined sugar is used to make the mash)

    Cold distill in stages in a 5 gallon plastic pail with a tight fitting lid, of the sort I usually buy wine juice in.

    Place a stainless steel salad bowl glued/screwed upside down to the underide of its lid.
    Place a 1 gallon stainless vessel inside the pail on spacers (I use 3-4 small granite pebbles).

    Add a glass tube type fish tank immersion heater with the tab stops broken off (to allow you to wind it up to a temperture that would slowly poach most fish) into the 1 gallon vessel.
    Route the cord out the top of the pail (I drilled a hole for the power plug, and sealed the plug with electricians duct sealing putty. Power from a GFI/RCD protected plug is a good idea.

    The vessel is postitioned so that the heated vapours rise, and condenses on the cooler outside walls and lid of the pail.
    The salad bowl makes sure the condensate on the top of the pail does not fall back into the heated vessel.
    The stones keep the liquid that collects in the bottom of the pail cooler than the heated vessel, so the whole pail does not warm up.

    Nicer product if you discard the first half days worth of condensate or keep it to re - distill later.
    Drain the condensate every few days, and keep the heated vessel full so the thermostat in the heater does not get clear of the liquid.
    Research heads and tails. First run is heads, and not the preferred output
    Dump the liquid in the heating vessel vessel after it gets under 5% alcohol on your hydrometer.

    The collected condensed liquid needs polishing.
    I run it though a vertical 4' tall 1.5" diameter copper pipe I had idle in the garage.
    Added a large plastic funnel at the top, using SAPT rubber tape to hold it on.
    Added a sink rubber plug to seal the charcoal top of the column when not in use.
    Slunging it from and old tripod with a screwed up head I had laying around to keep it verical.
    I sealed the bottom with a plate fitted with a dripper valve and then part of a stainelss steel pot scrubber went into the pipe and was tamped down to keep the valve clear of charcoal granules, and then fill the tube with actvalted granualted charcoal. (must be wasehd first, and generally kept wet once started.)
    Put a pail under the outlet to catch the outlet product.


    I would heat the distilled condensate in the microwave to warm it up, and add it to the water filled polishing column.
    Open the dripper valve full on and feel as the hot condensate dispaces the water in the pipe. When hot liquid hits the pipe bottom, turn the valve to one drip per second or slower, and leave the full funnel quanity time to slowly percolate though the activated charcoal granules.
    Output is what you want to keep. My hydrometer was not calibrated this far, but by extrapolation, it is around 35% or stronger alcohol content.
    Add hot water at the end to fill the column again, so granules do not dry out.

    I end up with 5 1.5l mason jars of kept product, and a bit more than 1L of 'heads', and the balance of the alcohol left in the supernatant and lees as tails

    Not the smoothest stuff for cocktails but fine for mixing with soft drinks, and fruit cordials. Great lemoncello starting point.
    A batch takes time to produce, but saved me cash, considering my government liquor outlet markets cheap vodka at over $30 per litre.

    I gave up the vodka and wine making up activities when my time got more consumed with kids actiivites.
    Nothing to keep me from going back to this in the future.
    Happy experimenting.
    my real name, imagine that.

  10. #60

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,522
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Does anyone mix the t-grain developers like DD-X or Tmax? I know they are "proprietary formulas" but has anyone figured them out yet?
    I looked thru my collections of formulas and found the following.

    Developer for T-Max Films

    This formula produces results similar to those of the T-Max developer. <BR>

    Distilled water (50°C) …………………………………………… 750 ml
    Sodium sulfite (anhy) ……………………………………………… 100 g
    Hydroquinone ……………………………………………………………………… 3.5 g
    Dimezone S …………………………………………………………………………… 2.2 g
    Sodium metaborate ………………………………………………………… 14.0 g
    Boric acid …………………………………………………………………………… 6.0 g
    Ethylene glycol ……………………………………………………………… 100 ml
    Distilled water to make ………………………………………… 1.0 l

    Use the same dilutions and development times as for T-Max developer.

    Another TMax developer

    Distilled water (50°C) …………………………………………… 750 ml
    Sodium sulfite (anhy) ……………………………………………… 5.0 g
    Dimezone ………………………………………………………………………………… 1.4 g
    Hydroquinone ……………………………………………………………………… 9.0 g
    Diethanolamine SO2 adduct 20 mole % ………… 130.0 g
    DTPA Na5 ………………………………………………………………………………… 5.0 ml
    Distilled water to make ………………………………………… 1.0 l

    The second formula looks like it might be closer to the Kodak product since it contains two special chemicals found in HC-110.

    Jerry
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin