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  1. #11
    eddie's Avatar
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    Stainless will maintain temperature better. Depending on time of year (my DR can be as low as 60 degrees in winter), and length of development (if over 10 minutes, or so), I sometimes opt for stainless.

  2. #12

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    To each his own on the reels, I use stainless and always have, but they do take a bit of practice. Use a no good roll of film (before or after development) for practice. As Bill and DWThomas say, you have to master the first entry onto the reel. There are many different kinds of SS reels, with different "catches" at the beginning. The simplest and best in my opinion were the original Nikkor reels, no clip, just one open side at the core, but these are hard to come by. The ones with clips and springs can be tricky. One thing to remember - once the film is kinked at the beginning point, it is very difficult to continue, might as well cut a clean edge and start again.
    Also, if the two spirals are not parallel in plane to each other, or bent in any way (can happen from dropping the reels), you will have problems. If you can push-pull the film as you load, you are probably on right. Also, I find it best to move (rotate) the reel when loading and keep the hand holding the film stationary.

  3. #13

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    I all the years that I have used SS reels I have never had a problem. I did however screw up a few films trying to use plastic reels. As mentioned it helps to practice a few times with junk film. Still some people just seem to be digitally challenged.

    Once you kink the film it is impossible to get it to load properly. The trick in this case is to load the film starting with the other end.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #14
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    Ah! That sucks—but if it's most likely my fault, I'll take the responsibility. I'll see how things go with my next roll.

    For reference: I use a SS tank with Hewes reels—they are used reels, but they've been easy to load up until now. I shoot with a Pentax MX, and it's been pretty easy to work with so far as well. Also: I don't have many temperature problems as it rarely ever gets below 35ºf here in Seattle, and my apartment usually stays an even temperature year-round.
    Last edited by keyofnight; 12-30-2012 at 09:40 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Well, you've got the feel for it when it's right... and when it's wrong.

    There aren't any other ways for it to reel.

    FYI, I have and use an infrared scope to do a lot of darkroom work... But reeling film is no easier with the viewer, it almost makes it harder.

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