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  1. #91
    fhovie's Avatar
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    D-76 is the standard by which all developers are judged - and it is a tough standard to beat. But a few alternatives have some advantages, not all other choices have advantages, and the advantages are not huge. But some are worth noting.

    You never need to be apologetic about using D-76 - It is a great brew and I keep it on hand for anytime I don't have something else better figured out. Your fixer on the other hand is likely the same composition that many of the greats produced their enduring classics with and is also a fine tool for use with D-76. If your materials make the art you like - they are great materials. Kind of like my paint can with a hole in it that I make panoramic photos with - simple or classic is not "better" or "worse" than "exotic" it is just an answer so good it has survived.
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  2. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deckled Edge View Post
    Tim,
    Why would you NOT?

    The fixer rapidly accumulates insoluable silver salts, which will eventually precipitate out onto the paper, and (being insoluable) cannot easily be washed away. That is why there are clear guidelines for the use of two fixer baths for archival prints, and why there are limits on how long you can use a finite amount of fixer.
    I'm also a big fan of a dilute sodium sulfite bath after the fix, to re-dissolve those little salty buggers before the final archival wash.
    We were talking about film.

    Paper is a totally different animal. I always use first fix and second fix for fiber prints. As well as a dilute toner for archival permanance.

    But film? When the fix stops working, pour it into the recycle jug and make some more. But not a film before.

    tim in san jose
    Last edited by k_jupiter; 02-28-2008 at 01:14 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: speling of corse
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  3. #93
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Gentlemen;

    The fixer rapidly accumulates SOLUABLE siver complexes! They do not precipitate out onto the paper or film if it has been stopped or rinsed in a bath prior to the fix to remove developer. They eventually accumulate to the point at which the fixer just stops working as it cannot dissolve insoluable silver salts from paper or film.

    The very worst that can happen is when an alkaline piece of film or paper goes into an exhausted fix bath, then dichroic fog can form on the paper or film due to a sort of continued development (reduction of excess silver salts to silver metal) on the surface of the coating.

    This is one reason why I suggest always using a stop bath. If a fixer is exhausted, you don't get dichroic fog and you don't ruin the picture as you can always refix in fresh fix as long as it has not been exposed to light.

    One example of an exception is TF-4 which is formulated to prevent this situation. But, even here I use a stop.

    PE

  4. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    that's a heck of a lot of feedback ... I'm developing HP5+ and time is 5 minutes (Dil B) at 68 F using Ilford rapid fixer and my wash is just 4 or 5 water refills with increasing agitation frequency with each fill.

    i guess by using water stop bath i'm extending the developing time minimally from 5 minutes upwards but unless i'm doing anything radically wrong in all this i'll just do it this way.
    You may be extending deveolpment Minimally, however, since Ilford rapid fixer is an acid fixer....
    Tom Hoskinson
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  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    One example of an exception is TF-4 which is formulated to prevent this situation. But, even here I use a stop.
    PE
    PE,

    Is this due to its alkaline nature or is it solely because of the formula? Would TF-3 have similar benefits?
    "The secret to life is to keep your mind full and your bowels empty. Unfortunately, the converse is true for most people."

  6. #96
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    TF-4 is heavily buffered and therefore resists pH changes strongly. All I can say is that it performs well with an acid stop bath and does not smell as much of ammonia as when you just use a rinse. It is very well formulated.

    PE

  7. #97
    Snapshot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    TF-4 is heavily buffered and therefore resists pH changes strongly. All I can say is that it performs well with an acid stop bath and does not smell as much of ammonia as when you just use a rinse. It is very well formulated.

    PE
    Thanks for the clarification PE.
    "The secret to life is to keep your mind full and your bowels empty. Unfortunately, the converse is true for most people."

  8. #98

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    Tim and PE
    I stand corrected twice!
    Thanks, Photo Engineer for once again untwisting my brain.

  9. #99

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    Formulary TF 4 rapid fixer is a great product-quick, not much odor when made with distilled H20....The fact that fixing is quicker obviously makes archival washing easier because the shorter time in the fixer probably means less fixer to wash out. to be certain, I called PF to ask about stop bath ( on prints ) and they recommended NOT using stop bath because of reports of mottling and streaking with prints using TF4 AFTER astop bath. However, they do have stop both compatible with TF 4 rapid fixer for those who desire to continue to use a stop bath rather then water.

    Ed

  10. #100

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mahler_one View Post
    ... because the shorter time in the fixer
    probably means less fixer to wash out. Ed
    Not so much is it less fixer. It is less attachment
    time for the fixer and it's silver complexes.

    Also the less fix in the fixer the less water and time
    to wash out. Currently I've been using a sodium
    thiosulfate fixer at 1/16 normal strength to fix
    Slavich paper. The fixer is used one-shot so
    the silver load is below archival levels. A
    hold/soak plus two soaks has the
    paper clean. Dan



 

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