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  1. #111

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    I believe that it would exhaust the fixer rather fast. People more knowledgeable than I will chime in I'm sure. Something about ph's
    Erik

  2. #112

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    None at all. The thing stop does is stop the developing process quickly, which makes consistancy easier. There can be some development that continues once it's in the rinse, but as long as it's consistent you can account for it. As I understand it, stop also helps preserve the fix by not lowering it's ph with any developer carryover that may occur (but with a good rinse, it shouldn't be much of an issue). But then again there are also alkaline fixers, I'm sure someone who who understands the chemistry in more detail will help out with facts about that part.

    Peter

  3. #113

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    Hi lensmagic,

    I've eschewed a stop bath whilst devving films for years, and have never had a problem. Just make sure you fill the tank with water to catch all the dev, agitate the tank, and you'll be fine.

    As Erik says, going from dev to fix without rinsing will contaminate and exhaust the fixer quickly.
    testing...

  4. #114

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    "I believe that it would exhaust the fixer rather fast."
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  5. #115
    Reinhold's Avatar
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    So far, lensmagic, you've heard a lot of testimonials, let's add a bit of fact...

    http://photo.net/black-and-white-pho...g-forum/003T9c

    That should help you decide what to do in ...your... particular situation.

    Reinhold

    www.classicBWphoto

  6. #116
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Thanks, Reinhold, for the link...it was interesting! I have been using a water stop for negs for 30 years...nice to know why my negs still look as good after so many years.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  7. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by lensmagic View Post
    ... what harm, if any, would result from moving the
    film directly from the developer to the first of
    the fixing baths???
    I regularly take film and paper from the developer
    directly to the fix. My fix in both cases is very dilute
    and used one-shot. A very dilute one-shot fix becomes
    VERY little loaded with silver. Washing is quick and
    a single bath give best possible results. Dan

  8. #118

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    Dan, if this is your procedure and you have no problems in either bleaching or toning afterward, I'd like to hear more. What is "very dilute"? With papers, do you monitor for silver in solution?

  9. #119
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Bear in mind, the damage to fixer is primarily if you use an acid fixing bath. An alkaline fixer is not affected by the alkalinity of developing agents, but a water bath or rinse is still wise.

    I no longer use a stop bath for film processing (I use a 60-second running water bath instead) because I use an alkaline fix, but I use acid fix for printing so I do use a stop bath there.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  10. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Ullsmith View Post
    Dan, if this is your procedure and you have no problems
    in either bleaching or toning afterward, I'd like to hear more.
    What is "very dilute"? With papers, do you monitor for
    silver in solution?
    Dilutions will vary according to solution volume and the
    amount of chemistry needed. Processing times go up
    with higher dilutions. So, some compromise is made
    twixt greatest chemical milage and reasonable
    processing times. Chemical amounts are
    predetermined, no monitoring. Dan



 

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