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  1. #161
    5stringdeath's Avatar
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    I only use stop with prints. Have only used water with film since the introduction of modern "rapid" fixers. Also if you ever get pinholes in your film due to stop bath, you'll stop using it too :-) Hasn't ever happened to me, but I've seen it happen.

  2. #162

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    FWIW, I've used both water rinses and stop baths, with no obvious differences; however, I've also never done a scientific side-by-side comparison.

    One point that's come up a few times here but deserves clarification is the claim that stop bath can extend the life of fixer. This is true of acid fixers, but not all fixers are acid. Some, such as TF-3, are alkaline rather than acidic, and an acid stop bath will, if anything, shorten their working lives. (Of course, you could use an acid stop bath and then rinse with water to avoid contaminating the fixer.) If the rental darkroom in question is providing chemicals, you may want to find out what it's using for a fixer, and research its needs, before you bring in your own stop bath.

  3. #163

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    Fotch and Steve: It's not you guys,,, I'm on several lists and so far today about 1/4 of them have gone in the ditch at some level. I didn't start the day off at work real well either ;-) Must be some rays from the yet to be discovered ufo's in orbit upsetting the natural order of things. (or the fact that the days are now quite a bit shorter and summer's on the way out) ;-)

  4. #164
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    I have used water as a stop bath almost my entire career. I have also used alkaline fixers since PMK. Works fine for me. I use a two tray procedure, one as the "stop" and one as a rinse. All kinds of people make all kinds of arguments for and against. I like having one less chemical to deal with, and I make some pretty nice negs, so what ain't broke I don't fix.

  5. #165

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    I have use both over the years, of course water is cheaper with no ill effects.

    Jeff

  6. #166

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    I use water for stop bath with film, have been for many years, works good. I agree with Jason, one less chemical to manage and mix makes life easier.

    Way back when, some people argued that the dilute developer that results increases shadow detail. I doubt that it does to any practical degree, but I've never done a test.

  7. #167
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    I've been shooting, and processing my B&W film for more years than some of you have been alive. I've never used any thing but water between the developer, and fix. I usually do 2 to 3 fast rinses, and have never seen a problem. My years as a USAF photographer, and lab tech, a watwer rinse was the norm fpr all films.

  8. #168
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Thats odd, my Handbook for Photo Lab Processing, AFM 95-11 suggests a Stop Bath or Hardening Stop for processing in section 3.

    In my years as a USAF photographer, we followed that.

    PE

  9. #169
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I use stop bath for both film and paper (mostly RC).

    I re-use fixer with film. For paper, I rely on the indicator in the stop bath to tell me when it is time to replace the stop bath, and to either replace the fixer or at least check its remaining capacity.

    I acknowledge that a running water rinse will work with both film and RC prints, but I don't believe that it works quite as well (due to extension of development times). I also value stop bath's ability to extend the useful life of my fixer.

    If and when I print on FB paper, I insist on using stop bath.

    By the way, I am currently using Ilford Hypam fixer. In the past I've used Ilford Rapid Fixer and Kodak Rapid Fixer. My developers are HC-110 for film, and Kodak Polymax for paper.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #170
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    By the way, I am currently using Ilford Hypam fixer. In the past I've used Ilford Rapid Fixer and Kodak Rapid Fixer. My developers are HC-110 for film, and Kodak Polymax for paper.
    Ilford Rapid Fixer & Hypam are essentially almost the same, Hypam has additional buffering for use with a Hardener. Aside from that they are to all intents and purposes inter changeable.

    Ian



 

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