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  1. #391
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Stop bath is more important with papers particularly fibre based where there's more carry over of developer. it's far less important with films and a water rinse is just as good.

    All the film/paper manufacturers recommend stop bath OR a water rinse with films, but always stop bath with papers. The manufacturers know best

    Ian

  2. #392
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Stop Bath
    Once the desired degree of development has been
    reached, the process must be stopped quickly to avoid
    overdevelopment. This can be achieved through a
    simple water rinse, but an acid stop bath is more
    effective in neutralizing the alkaline activators and
    stopping development almost instantaneously.
    A dilute solution of acetic or citric acid makes
    for a powerful stop bath. However, with developers
    containing sodium carbonate, the acid concentration
    must be kept sufficiently low to avoid the formation of
    carbon-dioxide gas bubbles in the emulsion, because
    this may lead to ‘pinholes’ in the emulsion.
    in short, after conducting a proper film test, an acid stop bath is an efective way of using the test data and stopping development when we need to. thi avoids after developmentand confusing resultswith overdeveloped highlightsand unrealistic speed points. the question is not why/ it is why not?pinholes and air bubbles as a reaction with sodiun carbonate can also be avoided by using a half-strength stop bath for films.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #393
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    The manufacturers know best

    Ian
    as in the malboro commercial
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #394

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    Re: Stop Bath.. How important?

    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    I use acetic stop bath, because every roll of film or sheet of paper that is not stopped as such, a baby dolphin will die and I just can't stomach the thought of all those dolphins....
    OMG.!! I did not know that. I wonder what citric acid could save....

  5. #395
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    With nothing between developer and fixer, it means that you are carrying a lot of crap into that fixer. It means that the fixer exhausts faster, and the chance of retained chemistry goes up!

    As format size goes up, then a stop becomes more critical for uniformity. You must stop development quickly or you will get some sort of blemish on the final image. This is particularly important with LF and ULF films and very big enlargements.

    PE

  6. #396

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    PE - also true with Alkaline fixers, such as TF-4 and TF-5?

  7. #397
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    George, TF-5 is mildly acidic.

    That said, YES I use a stop bath. After all, with TF4 there is no stopping action to speak of.

    However, a rinse after the stop is useful with TF4 or TF5 to extend the life of the fix.

    If you use only a water rinse, with no stop, you should use running water and not just a still water rinse. And, a rinse still can allow defects due to continued development.

    PE

  8. #398
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    There are long threads on the benefits..
    Yay mods merged thread...

  9. #399
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim k View Post
    OMG.!! I did not know that. I wonder what citric acid could save....
    and save them from suffering a cold too
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #400
    eclarke's Avatar
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    The Haist book says that acid stop bath is important to condition the film gelatin for acceptance of fixer..



 

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