Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,871   Posts: 1,583,324   Online: 1136
      
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 49
  1. #21
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,542
    Images
    65
    I am not old enough to be "in" on the details of this naming stuff for films, but I do believe that David is right.

    X means times. So Super X was 2x the speed of an earlier film, and Super XX was 2x the speed, while TriX is 3x the speed. So, we have 100, 200 and 400. And BTW, Tri X is supposed to be 400.

    PE

  2. #22
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,568
    Images
    46
    I don't know about rocket boosters... but I'm going to be buried reading "Photographic News for Amateur Photographers" for a while, this is fun reading.

  3. #23
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,568
    Images
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I am not old enough to be "in" on the details of this naming stuff for films, but I do believe that David is right.

    X means times. So Super X was 2x the speed of an earlier film, and Super XX was 2x the speed, while TriX is 3x the speed. So, we have 100, 200 and 400. And BTW, Tri X is supposed to be 400.

    PE
    Didn't all the films come out under the earlier ASA definition which included a safety factor?

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    16,883
    Images
    1
    hi bill

    i have an old DREM INSTOMETER from around 1937ish
    and there are no asa - type film speeds on it
    it just has scheiner speeds ... maybe when asa values were established
    they established the "X"factor
    where's george when we need him ?!

    john

  5. #25
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,431
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    Didn't all the films come out under the earlier ASA definition which included a safety factor?
    Yes they did.

    But it's the family of films introduced around 1939 that were based on the X factor, Pan X, Super XX and Tri X which came out at the same time so there's no reference back to earlier films.

    This family of films was introduced to compete with Ilfords new Pan F, Fine Grain Panchromatic and Hypersensitive Panchromatic which came out slightly earlier and still exists as Pan F, FP4+ and HP5+.

    Ian

  6. #26
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,542
    Images
    65
    In broad terms, ASA and ISO are the same to me. I use old meters with impunity! They are all marked in ASA and they still work. My newest automatic cameras use ISO in the internal meters and I still get the same density (within experimental error).

    Yeah, you are right, kinda, and so am I. There actually is so much "fudge factor" in both that it is hard to say. Mid scale speed taken from the straight line, is what we use in the lab! The toe can lead to imprecise results, and the best method is the inflection point of the toe from fog, but you don't take pictures there. It is the absolute speed point though.

    PE

  7. #27
    AgX
    AgX is online now

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,061
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    X means times. So Super X was 2x the speed of an earlier film, and Super XX was 2x the speed, while TriX is 3x the speed. So, we have 100, 200 and 400. And BTW, Tri X is supposed to be 400.

    PE
    As I said above:

    X=ASA 100 (and double and tri refer to the number of steps of doubling speed), as long as Panatomic-X is not spoiling the game....


    Thus so far I'm not convinced.


    It must mean something else. What about potion No.9...?

  8. #28

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    7,150
    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    ^ But David's theory doesn't work on the Microdol-X example....thinking X is used to mean Y....whatever that Y maybe
    However this may be the true marketing speak. X also represents the "unknown" aka "secret and special". So it was the practical film engineers who had a big say in the film nomenclature and the MAD men who were instrumental in the developer's name

    pentaxuser

  9. #29
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Everett, WA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    495
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    13
    Are you guys sure that it isn't Newspeak for something? Double-X Plus-X Good-X?

  10. #30
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,542
    Images
    65
    Well, AgX and David Lyga essentially say the same as I did. The X in film names refer to speed increases. Thus the 3 of us agree. Whether rue or not remains to be seen.

    I would like to suggest that the X in Microdol X refers to a secret ingredient. ! I have the name of that sitting right next to me in a little pocket note book that I had with me when either Dick Henn or Grant Haist gave it to me!!

    Panatomic X grew (IIRC) from an original formula by having the same grain but higher speed. The earlier film was not named Panatomic, but I can check on that if I get unlazy and look it up.

    PE

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin