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  1. #1

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    Kodak films: what does X represent?

    Hi,

    It might be a silly question for some of you but I wonder why Kodak uses "X" in their film codes: Double-X, Plus-X, Tri-X, etc... Does "X" have a special meaning regarding film characteristics or is it only a commercial trick?

    have a great 2013 year!
    "The problem with photography is that it only deals with appearances." Duane Michals

    "A photograph is a secret of a secret. The more it tells you the less you know." Diane Arbus

  2. #2

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    It's an excellent question. I look forward to the answer or answers

    pentaxuser

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    Welcome to APUG.

    I'll be curious to hear if anyone has an explanation, but even if they don't it isn't necessarily a "trick", just a name.

    I'll throw out my best guess here - "exposure". Plus-X - more exposure for the same settings as whatever preceded it. Double-X -twice that. Etc. It is just a convention now.

    If we figure this out, then we can take on "chrome", which got to be the common nickname for color transparencies. Verichrome I understand, but not how they got from that to Kodachrome.

  4. #4

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    my guess is it is just a gimmick like the word kodak, easy to remember, means nothing

  5. #5
    AgX
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    X = ASA 100

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Pan X was the slowest film available in the late 1930's in Kodaks new series of modern films which included Super XX and Tri X, these were made in in least 4 countries, US, Canada, UK and Hungary.

    Plus-X and Double X were later films.

    Ian

  7. #7
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Pan-X at ASA 32...such a wonderful film!
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  8. #8
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    X = ASA 100
    Well, with Panatomic-X in mind that does not make much sense...

    Do we have to expect from Kodak designations to make sense?

  9. #9
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I don't know but guess that it goes back to the glass plate speeds...

    Slow, Ordinary, Rapid, Extra Rapid, Double Extra Rapid.

    Where the X is from Extra.

    I've had a hard time finding how these speeds translate to ASA/ISO speeds. Seems any reference that knows these speeds predates ASA...

  10. #10

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    I think we need a Kodak source called PE There has to be a kind of reasoning behind the use of X doesn't there?

    pentaxuser

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