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  1. #1

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    Trying to achieve LARGE grain chemically.... how?

    I need some input from folks who has done this type of things already.

    For an image I'm trying to create, I need large and chunky grain - just as if I used Delta 3200. But with a caveat .. I need to shoot this scene in broad daylight and I need slower shutter speed coupled with large aperture. 1/60 or slower and f/2.8 or f/4 is necessary for this image.

    As a reference, the level of grainyness I'm looking for is Delta3200 in 35mm format processed with D76 for 13 minutes. When enlarged to 8x10, it has very obvious grain. Unfortunately, I only have ND4 and it won't reach nearly slow enough shutter speed or large enough aperture. (I've tried...)

    I've also tried Tri-X pushed 2 stops in XTOL. Way too smooth and way too fast.

    I've been researching and I hear processing Tri-X with Dektol will result in large grain. I've also read Rodinal will also create large grain.

    Right now, I have Tri-X, D-76, and Dektol handy. I'm willing to buy new developer if necessary.

    Here's the question - which will result in grainer image? Or is there another suggestion to achieve this chemically?
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #2
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Shoot with a very wide angle lens and enlarge extremely.

    Overexpose it. (Sounds like your plan already with long exposure and large aperture).

    The Dektol may do the trick.

    PE told me the rule of thumb, develop for as many minutes as you dilute it. (1:5 for 5 minutes, 1:9 for 9 minutes etc.)

    You will end up with a very dense negative. That should be plenty grainy by the time you print it.

    p.s. Wait for more replies from people who have done it. (I've developed a few negs in Dektol but didn't try to print it yet.)

  3. #3
    Double Negative's Avatar
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    Reticulate!

  4. #4

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    One thing you can do is to shoot with a wider angle lens or from farther away and then enlarge the snot out of it when printing. That will give you some grain.

    Do you have a polarizing filter? I know you say you only have and ND filter, but many people don't think of a polarizer as being a ND filter on its own. That will cost you two stops worth of light. The polarizer combined with your ND might do the trick.

    As far as devs go. Yes, Dektol will give you grain, so will Rodinol. I wouldn't go D-76; too much sulfite to reduce grain unless you went 1+3 with it, but I would still prefer Dektol or Rodinal.

  5. #5

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    Thank you, Bill. I'll give it a try.

    I want LARGE and CHUNKY grain....!
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #6

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    Try Rodinal at a higher temperature. I believe this may get the grain you desire.
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

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  7. #7

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    Jim,

    Yes, I do have a polarizer as well. I'll bring it along next time I go shoot the scene. As to wide angle lens, it won't work for this scene because then, the size relationship between foreground item and the background will change. This is a very important part of this particular image. In fact, I have a particular lens and a particular position to make this composition happen.

    I'll report back when I have something. Thank you all!
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8

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    Double negative,

    So far, I have not been able to cause reticulation even when I process very sloppily. Maybe use ice water to wash? Reticulated film has this fish scale like appearance. That's not what I'm looking for. Thank you for the idea though.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #9

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    If you want the Delta 3200 look, you should shoot Delta 3200. Use a 5-stop ND filter.

  10. #10

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    T

    what other sorts of paper developers do you have on hand ?
    what format film?

    dektol might give you lots of chunky big grain ... but other PAPER developers might too ..

    you might try over exposing and over developing your film
    in whatever developer you use, and process it a bit warmer than 68 ...
    i hate to advertise coffee, but you might also give caffenol c a whirl
    it gives nice grain .. not sure how chunky but nice ...
    and it sometimes looks weird, thin, foggy, but enlarges like a dream

    bill is on the money, wide angle and enlarger too

    have fun !
    john
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