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  1. #11

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    I think it's easiest to use a syringe to draw up the concentrate, rather than try to pour it from vessel to vessel. In most places you can get syringes (without needles, of course) over the counter, at drugstores and similar places.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  2. #12
    kintatsu's Avatar
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    The one thing I would recommend is one of those medicine syringes. That will allow mixing straight from concentrate. I mix 1 liter, using about 15.7 ml concentrate with 984ish ml water. When I tray develop I can do 8 sheets of 4x5 using 1/2 liter for each 4, or in a tank I can do 4 sheets, as my steel Nikor tank takes 1 liter. The Patterson universal takes up to 1/2 liter.

    The links above are awesome for information. Another good one is http://mysite.verizon.net/fowler/photo/hc110.htm This site has a good chart to go along with the information.

    I've used it with FP4+ and HP5+ with nice results. Even using one roll of film, just fill your tank full and you'll get good results. Don't let the frustration stop you, this can be a very rewarding experience. At least, for me it has!

  3. #13

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    While I occasionally use a syringe to measure concentrate, I prefer to take the "stock solution" route, mixing 8oz of stock at a time. I just find it easier to measure out the stock solution in a graduated cylinder in preparing dilution B and especially dilution H.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    FWIW, Kodak's instructions for HC110 now include both approaches - either using an intermediate stock solution or mixing straight from concentrate.

    If you want to prepare the intermediate stock solution, you make it up by adding three parts water to one part concentrate - typically those who work that way just dump the 16 ounce bottle of concentrate into a half gallon (64 US oz) container and fill it with water. When you dilute that half gallon to working ("B") strength it makes 4 US gallons of working solution - perfect for a high capacity lab.

    For those of us who process a smaller quantity of film, the intermediate stock solution is a way to make the measurements easier, but the stock solution has a limited shelf life. So most of us mix it straight from concentrate. That sticky concentrate isn't easy to measure in small amounts (typically 6 ml or so for me) but solutions like small syringes help.

    I find using a 45 ml graduated cylinder works for me. I put in 20 ml or so of water, then I carefully pour the concentrate in until the total volume is 6 ml more.

    I've switched over to using HC110 replenished, but prior to my switch I was using as recommended by Jason Brunner - his 1 + 49 method (essentially the same as dilution "E") works well with the Patterson tanks. Here is the link: http://www.jasonbrunner.com/hc110.html

    EDIT: for clarity, all the posts in this thread are assuming you are using the more common packaging that originates n North America. There is a more dilute version of HC110 that can be found sometimes in Europe.
    EDIT2: Here is the link to Kodak' HC110 technical publication J24: http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/j24/j24.pdf
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Good point about the US/Euro versions. (concentrations are different)
    I had thought of it but I forgot to mention it.

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