Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,807   Posts: 1,581,429   Online: 1126
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,031
    A bit off topic: I experienced a luminescent afterglow with a incandescent lamp too, with a 40W halogen G9-socket lamp.
    I inquired at the manufacturer (Philips) but never got a reply.

  2. #12
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    915
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by henk@apug View Post
    I am thinking to start developing my 4x5 film in open tanks or trays.
    Could the afterglow give problems of fogging film ?
    I have four CFL bulbs in my darkroom, and when I work with film, I usually give them about a minute before I bring out the film. Yes, you can still see some glow, but you can also see some glow from your thermometers and your timers. Never had a problem.

    Back in the 90s, I worked with a photographer who shot 4x5 chromes and nothing else. He would have me load his film in a closet, where after about 60 seconds, I could literally see the outline of my hand. I'd say, "Brad, I can see my hand in there!" He'd say "Don't worry about it. It's not enough to fog the film." And it was never once a problem for the two years I assisted him. It always freaked me out, though.

    If you've ever flashed paper, you know how much light it takes to get to the threshold. It's always way more than you'd think, which is good.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  3. #13
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    794
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Tray processing in total darkness is a pain in the ass!!
    For you. Many, many others do it often and well, without undue stress.


    Here's a positive suggestion for the OP. Wire up a footswitch to any incandescent source, even a hardware store portable clamp style light, over your developing area. Use it instead of your fluorescents, when developing film.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,124
    Quote Originally Posted by ROL View Post
    For you. Many, many others do it often and well, without undue stress.
    I said it was a pain to do not that it was particularly difficult. There IS a difference. Something like dealing with the Department of Motor Vehicles.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin