Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,989   Posts: 1,524,077   Online: 1069
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    henk@apug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Belgium
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    181

    Fluorescent light film developing in trays

    In my darkroom I use fluorescent light. This gives some afterglow, but I have absolutely
    no problems with that when enlarging.

    I am thinking to start developing my 4x5 film in open tanks or trays.
    Could the afterglow give problems of fogging film ?
    Anyone experience with that ?

    Thanks !

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,769
    Paper is far less sensitive to light than film. I would sacrifice a sheet of film and do something similar to a safelight test.

    Tray processing in total darkness is a pain in the ass!! Some people use an IR vision systen to see what they are doing.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 01-07-2013 at 01:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #3
    henk@apug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Belgium
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    181

    Fluorescent light film developing in trays

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Some people use an IR vision systen to see what they are doing.
    The military among us, I suppose

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,156
    Images
    2
    Turn the lights off several minutes before opening the film holders and there should be no problem at least I have never had a problem with a similar set up. You could also use a small lamp or clip-on bulb holder found in hardware stores with a regular tungsten bulb (while they still exist) to set things up and not turn on the fluorescent bulbs at all.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    869
    Simplest option, as mentioned above, is to turn off the main lights an hour (huuuuge safety margin) before you will be developing then just use a desk-lamp (with tungsten, led or halogen bulb) for the time remaining. Even an led bike light would make enough illumination to set up your developing trays, if not already done earlier under your main lighting. Basically there is no need to solve the problem when you can avoid it with no effort or cost.

  6. #6
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Virginia, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,891
    Images
    241
    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Paper is far less sensitive to light than film. I would sacrifice a sheet of film and do something similar to a safelight test.

    Tray processing in total darkness is a pain in the ass!! Some people use an IR vision systen to see what they are doing.
    I have never had a florescent light in my darkroom, so my comments are purely anecdotal. A ceiling fan in my bedroom has cfl bulbs in it. I notice that if that I turn that light off at night and go to bed, the bulbs glow for a really long time. I don't know if cfl bulbs glow longer than florescent tubes, but it made me a believer that florescents have no business in a darkroom if one intends to have unprocessed film out and about.

    Like Gerald, I too used to think tray developing was a PITA, until I was forced by circumstances to do it. Now I consider it a test of my organizational skills, to make sure that everything is set out in exactly the right place and in exactly the right order and that I follow my procedure precisely. I have also learned to give myself little tactile clues like the developer tray is the only one with the spout facing me so that I know that I am moving the slosher tray from presoak into developer and not stop bath (as I did once a long time ago...) Now I rather enjoy those 15 or so minutes in total darkness.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  7. #7
    AgX
    AgX is online now

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,354
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Henderson View Post
    ..., but it made me a believer that fluorescents have no business in a darkroom if one intends to have unprocessed film out and about.
    Fluorescent lights though have very positive characteristics. So, one could either wait for a (tested) time for the luminescence to diminish, or just mount a flap(s) at the fixture to easily be swung into position.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Fluorescent lights though have very positive characteristics. So, one could either wait for a (tested) time for the luminescence to diminish, or just mount a flap(s) at the fixture to easily be swung into position.
    I.e. piece of black cardboard you put over the lights after turning them off.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    33
    I worked in darkrooms for years with florescent lighting and never had a problem fogging paper or film. There are, however different types of florescent ballasts that may affect the situation. Our lights appeared to be instant on and instant off. At any rate if you sit in the dark for a minute or two, your eyes will tell you if there's any light coming from the tubes. regards ---john.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    655
    I'll add a data point to Dan's post. In the name of energy conservation I originally put four CFLs in my darkroom ceiling cans but they glowed for so long after turning them off I immediately replaced them with 40w incandescents. I also use a single 48 inch fluorescent wrapped with an (over-priced) plastic safelight film sheet. No problems there.

    s-a
    I photograph things to see what things look like photographed.
    - Garry Winogrand

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin