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  1. #11
    zsas's Avatar
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    Many folks like avail light. Where press photog's back in the day using flash? I presume and that might explain the variance to some degree.
    Andy

  2. #12

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    If you shoot available light in dim environments then even with f1.4 lenses you can find yourself wanting fast films. I am coming back to film from digital, my D3 spends a lot of time in the 2500-3200 range and I shoot it up to 6400. I am looking forward to being able to shoot at real ISO100 in studio, but still want to be able to work in hi ISOs for other events.

  3. #13
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    I push film because 3200 film isn't available in sheet sizes. Also, how about those low-light situations when f/2.8 gives you a 1/2 second shutter time at 3200? That's wide open for my 645.

    When shooting in low light, things are going to be different from normal daylight. You have reciprocity correction, you have pushing the film, you have metering difficulties, etc. Things change.

    Of course pushing doesn't mean a real speed increase. However, it is the difference between not having a workable photograph at all. Take a look at Occupy Everett photos in the gallery. That was done at f/2.8, 1/2sec. There is a *lot* of movement that can happen in 1/2 second, which means that someone's limbs can completely disappear. When people's heads are bobbing around, 1/2 second is too slow for the shutter speed. So I had to wait until they paused for a bit to have recognizable people in the shot.

    As for TMax 400, it's OK to 1600, but at 3200 the lowest it will register on a gray scale is about the normal midpoint, and there's nothing beyond that. What I always recommend is that a person needs to do their own testing, and do it with an actual gray scale, like the Kodak test targets.

  4. #14
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Why not use a tripod indoors? Depends on what kind of photography I suppose.
    I agree about 'type' of photography matters. From my own perspective, I shoot a lot of hand held portraiture. Using a tripod is usually not going to work unless I am working with somebody that is good at posing, because it takes away that element of spontaneity and surprise, where people are not yet quite realizing they are being photographed, where they look relaxed and natural. After that moment has gone, 90% of people freeze up and start to try to 'look their best', resulting in them looking completely unnatural, stiff, and frozen up and there simply is no time to readjust a tripod. It's a matter of a split second, and it's busy work just to get the focus perfectly done.
    The attached picture of my second cousin Carolin is basically a 'surprise' moment, where she wasn't really aware that I was pointing the camera at her until I made her aware. The next frame was terrible. That was Tri-X at 800.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails caroline_2012-jan_01_921192.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15

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    Nice portrait!

  6. #16

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    what did you develop that portrait in? It's great!

  7. #17
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Pushy photographers

    Quote Originally Posted by horacekenneth View Post
    what did you develop that portrait in? It's great!
    It doesn't really matter what the developer is, but I chose one where the highlights were easily held in check with agitation every three minutes, due to the strong light from her right.

    The point is that if she would have been more aware, the moment would have been lost, hence not doable with a tripod.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I'm curious - why do we see so many threads/questions about pushing film?

    Ok, back in the day when press/reportage etc photographers were firing away with Tri-X they did what they had to do to get a shot. Alternatively, the effect on image characteristics is ocasionally used for aesthetic purposes.

    But it seems like many people are just pushing film because they think they're getting significantly more real speed, and trying to figure out which developer is best, and they're using it as their normal procedure.

    I guess aside from some kind of special effect, I've always thought of pushing (ie underexposing and overdeveloping) as a last resort.

    Thoughts?
    I agree completely, as are many photographic chemical/time/temperature variations which are not necessary and often detrimental to the final image characteristics.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  9. #19

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    Horacekenneth:

    All things equal, a compensating/acutance developer would normally be best for pushing. They typically provide the highest film speeds to begin with, and when overdeveloping it is easier to restrain contrast. This can also be accomplished to some extent with diluted solvent developers, but in some cases such as D-76, dilution does not produce a true speed increase.

    To maximize a film's real speed, most true acutance/compensating formulas tend to produce a small speed increase (not a push), and there are some solvent developers that do this too - typically they are Phenidone-based developers like XTOL, Microphen, DD-X, TMax.

    These properties vary from film to film, of course. It also depends greatly on the amount of shadow detail/local contrast you personally prefer. I like full shadow separations, so for me, based on my testing I've never found so-called speed increasing developers to really give me a useful speed increase. What they do offer me is less of a speed loss with contracted development. Others might come to very different conclusions. Some people say developers like FX-1, FX-2, and some two-baths like Diafine give them a full extra stop or real speed above box speed with non-tabular films.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    It doesn't really matter what the developer is, but I chose one where the highlights were easily held in check with agitation every three minutes, due to the strong light from her right.

    The point is that if she would have been more aware, the moment would have been lost, hence not doable with a tripod.
    I like the grain size and the tones more than anything else, the developer matters pretty strongly there as far as I understand.

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