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  1. #11

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    Good Evening, Sjixxxy,

    I wasn't clear. I use a motor base to rotate the drum, but mine is one-directional so I turn the drum 180 degrees every 30 seconds although I suspect it probably wouldn't make much difference if I just put it on the rollers and let it go in one direction for the entire development time.

    Konical

  2. #12
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    I, too, really enjoy tray development for 4x5 Tri-X 320. I use ID11 (essentially the same as D76) diluted 1 to 1 (giving each sheet about 100ml of diluted developer) for 9 minutes with very satisfactory results. It's taken a good deal of time to learn to handle the film without scratching it, but I seem to have accomplished that task at last. Don't make assumptions about your clumsiness/dexterity...practice on some throwaways til you're proficient...it's just not that difficult. Have some wine, listen to some good music and give it a go....I can't imagine you not doing it well sooner than later.
    John Voss

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  3. #13

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    Tri-X 320 in 4x5 sheets done in Rodinal is certainly a good combination. I've done it quite a few times in daylight tanks, but I see no reason for a problem if you are using trays. I used the times for Tri-X 400 roll fim as a starting point and make some minor adjustments from there, mostly to compensate for different lighting conditions. The base time for Tri-X 400 with Rodinal at 1+50 given on "The Massive Dev Chart" (13 min @ 20 deg C.) works pretty well as it is.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Konical
    Cheryl,

    In regard to John's comment above about T-Max RS: I have processed various kinds of film in the regular T-Max without ever encountering stains of any kind. This happened somewhat accidentally for me; by chance, I noticed the "for roll films only" notice on the bottle only after I had blundered along for years using the stuff for sheet film. Perhaps the problem John cites is due to variations in local water supplies.

    Konical

    konical -
    you are pretty lucky!
    the first time i used tmax developer with sheet film i got "the stain" ... and when i contacted kodak they said it was because i didn't use the "rs"
    -john

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian
    konical -
    you are pretty lucky!
    the first time i used tmax developer with sheet film i got "the stain" ... and when i contacted kodak they said it was because i didn't use the "rs"
    -john
    John, take a look at the Kodak MSDS sheets for these two developers. They are very similar - the basic difference between them is that the rs version chemistry was designed to be replenished. This is a bit tricky since the chemistry uses an organic form of sulfite and an organic alkali (HC-110 heritage?).

    However, I don't see any obvious reason why either version of the developer, used as a one-shot, would plate out silver and cause dichroic fog.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson
    John, take a look at the Kodak MSDS sheets for these two developers. They are very similar - the basic difference between them is that the rs version chemistry was designed to be replenished. This is a bit tricky since the chemistry uses an organic form of sulfite and an organic alkali (HC-110 heritage?).

    However, I don't see any obvious reason why either version of the developer, used as a one-shot, would plate out silver and cause dichroic fog.
    hi tom:

    not sure why the fog gave me a problem ... maybe it is the water here in rhode island as konical suggested - i figured they made narragansett beer from the same water, it couldn't be all that bad -

    in any case the good folks at ol'yeller were the ones that told me the fog was due to using normal tmax developer, instead of the RS for processing sheet film. i am pretty much clueless as to how or why or what caused the problem, and know that farmers reducer + fixer will help get rid of it
    Last edited by jnanian; 01-03-2005 at 02:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
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    Cheryl

    I process 4 sheets at a time (Hp5 mostly) in D76 1+1 for 13 min. turning the sheets every min. followed by a rocking the tray (8x10 tray). I have not invested in tubes because the tray works fine for me. A little practice and no scratches and all or developed evenly. I also have used Rodinal and I am starting to prefer it to D76. It has a unique look.

    Incidently, I used my 4x5 on exactly one portrait session and over new year Holiday I saw my print framed next to others I have shot of the same child and it stood out! I made a New years resolution to not limit 4x5 to landscapes and fine art photography!

  8. #18
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    There are divider trays you can make or buy that will fit into a 8x10 tray. This way you can do 4 sheets at once with them sperated, and not worry about the shuffling thing. Other than that, there are some used Jobo tanks that can be had on ebay that will do 6 sheets at a time. I have besides the jobo, a nikor tank that does 12. If you want, and I will not promise it right away. I will pull out my tools and make you a divider tray for your 8x10 tray. I'll do it in stainless steel wire, that I dip into that plastic handle stuff so it will not scratch your negatives.
    Non Digital Diva

  9. #19

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    don't the negatives float up in those things? Something I have always wondered about.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  10. #20

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    time

    Cheryl-I develop in trays with xtol 1:1. For 4x5 tri-x rate at 320 and develop 4-6 sheets in the tray for 8 to 8:45 minutes. I shuffle the 4 sheets in under 30 seconds and then wait 30 seconds for the next shuffle. Makes for beautiful negatives. Trays are low tech and can be taken anywhere. I won't dispute other methods as I never used them for sheet film. And yes-there is a ZEN thing going on during that time in the darkroom.
    Regards Peter

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