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  1. #1
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Tray development times

    I've just shot some Tri-X 320 4x5 that I'd like to develop this afternoon. I've only shot large format a few times, so am still clumsy with tray developing and development times.

    On hand, I have Tmax developer, Rodinal, and FG-7. I'm too clumsy for the "shuffling" technique, so I use gentle continuous agitation (rocking the tray) instead. Can anyone help me out with some dilutions and times for any of these developers?

    I typically use the massive dev chart, but 1) there's no sheet film data for these developers, and 2) I'm not sure what kind of agitation they're assuming in the times they do provide.

    Hoping to get these developed this afternoon so I can print this evening. Anyone?

    Thanks in advance.

    - CJ

  2. #2
    John_Brewer's Avatar
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    This may help (scroll down a bit - loads of stuff on this page)

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/f9/f9.jhtml

    Personally I don't like total dark/have the patience for/scared i'll damage the film etc with tray development so I use a Patterson orbital processor designed for developing colour paper. They are cheap (try E-bay) and are economical with chemistry if you don't have loads to dev, and it's just like using a regular 35mm film tank.
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  3. #3
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Cheryl
    Generally, the development times listed for roll film are good places to start for sheet film too.

    Rodinal 1:50 is an excellent combo to start with using Tri-X. I think my time was about 11 minutes but you should double check that-I might be remembering something different.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
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  4. #4

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    Good Evening, Cheryl,

    John has the right idea. Drum (tube) processing is about the simplest way to go. My favorite drum is the Chomega (8 x 10 size for four sheets of 4 x 5 film), but the Unicolor drum apparently works well also. Some like a reversing motor base, but I find no problem with lifting and reversing the drum at regular intervals.

    Konical

  5. #5

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    Cheryl,
    For some reason the tri-x data sheet says Tmax developer is not recommended for the sheet film. I'm guessing because the development times get pretty short. I've never tried this combination before(I've been using xtol for the tri-x sheet film).

    Mike

  6. #6
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Thanks, all. If I start shooting 4x5 on a more regular basis, I'll look into drum processing. For now, I really don't mind trays in the dark. Kinda peaceful in there.

    Mike, yeah, that was my concern. If I started at the recommended Tri-X 320 times for roll film in tmax (7.25 min) it would certainly not be too fast -- so that implies to me that the tray time would be significantly different. Hmmmmm.

    I'll give the Rodinal a try and see how it goes.

    - CJ

  7. #7

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    hi cheryl - -

    if you eventually decide to use tmax developer with your sheet film, make sure it is '''rs" ... otherwise you may have trouble with a green metalic stain called dichrilic fog.

    - good luck!
    - john

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Short times can be advantageous with open trays or deep tanks and hangers. There's no issue with fill time, as with a daylight tank, and longer times will increase the risk of fog if you have any small light leaks in the darkroom. If your times are really short (less than 5 minutes, say), you might use a presoak to be on the safe side.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  9. #9
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Konical
    Good Evening, Cheryl,

    John has the right idea. Drum (tube) processing is about the simplest way to go. My favorite drum is the Chomega (8 x 10 size for four sheets of 4 x 5 film), but the Unicolor drum apparently works well also. Some like a reversing motor base, but I find no problem with lifting and reversing the drum at regular intervals.

    Konical
    I like the base. I just take the timer back with me and monkey around on the computer while it does the work.
    Gear: Camera, Brain, Light.
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  10. #10

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    Cheryl,

    In regard to John's comment above about T-Max RS: I have processed various kinds of film in the regular T-Max without ever encountering stains of any kind. This happened somewhat accidentally for me; by chance, I noticed the "for roll films only" notice on the bottle only after I had blundered along for years using the stuff for sheet film. Perhaps the problem John cites is due to variations in local water supplies.

    Konical

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