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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    Since you'll be scanning, why not use a clean color negative film like 160 or 400 Portra. They scan really well and have little grain. Since you'll be working with PS, you can punch up the contrast in post. You also will have more control of the conversion to B/W starting with color negatives than with B/W negatives. You can make lighter or darker monochrome tones for each color separately. You can't do that with B/W negatives.
    It would feel too much like converting my normal color digital files to B&W! I really can't complain about the current conversions I get in PS; I tweak them to the point of looking as if they were shot with film. They key words are "looking as if" they were shot with film. There is a richness in tones that can only be achieved with true B&W film. The biggest challenge is scanning the negatives as best as possible to capture those tones. While I have recently printed/framed 16"x20" B&W conversions for commercial display, I know I could have gotten even richer results had I started with a B&W negative.

  2. #42
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    Thanks everyone! I ordered several rolls of Kodak Tmax and Ilford Delta 400.

  3. #43

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    I've found that Fuji SPD developer results in much less grain than D-76 when using Tri-X 400. D-76 requires more vigorous agitation to avoid uneven development but that results in more grain. SPD works great with very slow agitation (continuous for first 60 seconds followed by 10 seconds each additional minute). Speed of agitation is about 4 full inversions in 10 seconds. With D-76 I find that I have to do much faster and more frequent agitation for about 4-5 seconds every 30 seconds or else the edges get bright and center is dark. I've just purchased a bunch of T-Max 400 and a bottle of Ifosol 3 so we will see how that turns out in a few days.
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  4. #44

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    I'm a custom lab tech and use T-Max TMRS developer on T-Max Films in particular TMY with good results. A lot of my customers are in the Annual Report business and shoot in all kinds of lighting conditions.
    Bill LaPete

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by bill@lapetelabs.com View Post
    I'm a custom lab tech and use T-Max TMRS developer on T-Max Films in particular TMY with good results. A lot of my customers are in the Annual Report business and shoot in all kinds of lighting conditions.
    Bill LaPete
    My next project is finding an online B&W lab where I can send my rolls to be developed.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by snegron View Post
    My next project is finding an online B&W lab where I can send my rolls to be developed.
    Why not just do it yourself? It's easy and so cheap.
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  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by revdocjim View Post
    Why not just do it yourself? It's easy and so cheap.
    I plan to in the near future. For now I have to use a lab. I don't have the space/facilities to develop my own rolls at this time.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by snegron View Post
    I plan to in the near future. For now I have to use a lab. I don't have the space/facilities to develop my own rolls at this time.
    I develop my film at the kitchen table. All the chemicals and equipment fits in two shopping bags and gets stored in a closet when not in use. I hang the negatives to dry just about anywhere in the house and then scan them at my desk.
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  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by revdocjim View Post
    I develop my film at the kitchen table. All the chemicals and equipment fits in two shopping bags and gets stored in a closet when not in use. I hang the negatives to dry just about anywhere in the house and then scan them at my desk.
    Finding a dark enough space in my house is a problem. Working inside a bag (loading film onto a reel inside a bag) is next to impossible for me! Back in my much younger days when I used to develop my own negatives and printed my own work, I had trouble loading film onto reels; and that was in a large darkroom! As for the chemical storage, I remember it having to be refrigerated (especially due to the fact that it is very hot here in Florida); that would take up precious real estate space inside my refrigerator!

    For these first few rolls I would like a pro lab to develop them. If I like the results then I will invest more time and effort into creating a small lab in my house, then I will develop my own stuff.

  10. #50

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    I am not very experienced... but here goes what I have tested in 120.

    T-max 400 in Rodinal 1:50 has non-perceivable grain in a 16x16 inch enlargement (about 7.5x) as seen from 1 foot.
    It is less grainy (a lot less) than a Tri-X at 10 to 12 inch side print (4.5x to 5.5x), from Rodinal 1:50 development.
    It was immediately apparent that the grain structure was not the same.

    Depending on your enlargement sizes, T-max 400 might be the only film you will ever need. It is also one of the cheapest 400 films in Europe, if not the cheapest.

    http://www.macodirect.de/roll-film-c...7_322_324.html

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