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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    You're using rapid fixer. In my experience, five minutes ought to be enough time with rapid fixer. However, if the instructions say to fix for ten minutes and you otherwise follow the instructions, ten minutes it is!

    There are ways to determine the exact amount of time needed to correctly fix film, using a clip of undeveloped film and a stopwatch but, for now, let's just do things by the book.
    I developed some colour film in the fixer on Friday, so I wasn't sure if that would have affected the fixer or not and left it in longer just to be sure. Good to know that 5 minutes is all it needs for B&W though. My darkroom tuition was from a self-taught fellow, so my technical knowledge as such is nil. So far I've mainly just followed the instructions from him & from the Ilford fact sheets, I'll have to trawl the charity shops for some darkroom books! The only way is up though, right?

    Thank you again

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by supersara2001 View Post
    Thanks all

    I've never re-fixed/re-washed before. Apart from using my usual go-to reel & dry the film, do I need to be aware of anything? I fixed for 10 minutes already, so how much longer should I go for? Sorry for all the questions, but I really do appreciate the help!

    I know the reel was dry cos it hasn't been used since I was lent it in November, but I'm half-wondering if the tank itself was still damp when I loaded it. If so I might hold off for another day just to be on the safe side.
    Hi Supersara and welcome to Apug,

    Re-fixing and re-washing won't harm your film, just do it as normal, agitate the fixer to make sure it gets to the rebates, wash and dry as usual. There's some possibility that the fixer can start dissolving the shadow details on the negative after a few hours in the fixer, but that won't be a problem here.

    Drops of water inside the tank could cause condensation on the film, as could a change between warm and cool environments (outside to inside, warm bathroom or kitchen etc). It's possible that condensation formed on the film stuck it to the spiral, stopping chemicals getting to the surface. I've sometimes left film undeveloped in tanks for several days and haven't had any problems. That's the only thing I can think might cause this.

    Cheers and good luck,
    kevs
    Last edited by kevs; 01-14-2013 at 02:51 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: condense and clarify text
    testing...

  3. #13

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    Ah, my bad sorry. I was under the impression the emulsion was separate to the cellulose instead of being part of it. I'll re-fix & re-wash the film in a different reel tomorrow & hopefully that will solve the problem. Thanks!

  4. #14
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by supersara2001 View Post
    My darkroom tuition was from a self-taught fellow, so my technical knowledge as such is nil.
    You know enough to know what you don't know... You know?
    There's a lot to be said for that!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by supersara2001 View Post
    Ah, my bad sorry. I was under the impression the emulsion was separate to the cellulose instead of being part of it. I'll re-fix & re-wash the film in a different reel tomorrow & hopefully that will solve the problem. Thanks!
    The emulsion is on top of the cellulose triacetate backing, so your assumption is correct, but the fixer doesn't remove the emulsion, it just removes the undeveloped silver from that emulsion.

    Most likely there was moisture either on the reels or in the air in the tank. Sitting there for three days, the emulsion on the film absorbed that moisture, causing the film to stick in the channels of the reels. When you started the development process, the developer and other liquids weren't able to be absorbed into the emulsion because the stuck on reel got in the way.

    You do not necessarily need to put the film back on to the reels to refix and wash them, but you can. The entire process can of course be done in the light as well.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Most likely there was moisture either on the reels or in the air in the tank. Sitting there for three days, the emulsion on the film absorbed that moisture, causing the film to stick in the channels of the reels. When you started the development process, the developer and other liquids weren't able to be absorbed into the emulsion because the stuck on reel got in the way.
    +1

  7. #17
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    supersara2001, from what I understand, you have some yellow spots on the film.
    Refixare and rewashing operations are never bad.
    After me, the yellow dots that you know the film appeared to be thiosulphate decomposition in sulfite and colloidal sulfur.
    Those particles can be colloidal sulfur yellow.
    Washing with water and use to end substance that reduce surface tension
    can do better.
    Filter the fixer solution or replace.

    George

  8. #18
    AgX
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    Those "creamy" stripes were visible after opening the reel, they can't be due to decomposition at this stage.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Most likely there was moisture either on the reels or in the air in the tank. Sitting there for three days, the emulsion on the film absorbed that moisture, causing the film to stick in the channels of the reels. When you started the development process, the developer and other liquids weren't able to be absorbed into the emulsion because the stuck on reel got in the way.
    I think this is almost certainly the cause having thought about it. I develop & leave the tank to air dry in the bathroom. As of now, my habit will change to leaving it dry in the spare room where I store everything & load the films.

    Thank you all, I really appreciate the help & warm welcome to the forums

  10. #20
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    I have an old dish rack from the kitchen to dry utensils and containers in.
    (Took the one from the kitchen counter then bought the wife a new one.)

    Setting containers right side up while drying lets water collect at the bottom where it doesn't dry quickly. Setting containers upside down stops water collecting but, without enough air circulation, they don't dry quickly that way, either. Having a drying rack where containers can sit, upside down, with good air circulation, allows them to dry better.

    I suppose, if you were careful to clean everything well enough, that you could dry your developing tank on the sink board in your kitchen but I prefer to keep darkroom stuff and food stuff separate. However, if you live in an apartment with limited space and resources, you might have to get creative. Just be extra careful to keep chemicals and foodstuffs far apart.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

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