Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,541   Posts: 1,544,373   Online: 1076
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    8

    Yellow marks along sprocket holes of entire film?

    Hiya,

    I just developed an in-date roll of Ilford HP5+ in Ilfosol 3, with Ilfostop & RapidFixer as I've done a few times over this week. There's yellow/cream strips along the sprocket holes along the length of the film. The images themselves are untouched thankfully. I've not seen these marks before so I was wondering if anyone could confirm if it's emulsion that wasn't removed properly? As I opened the reel the markings correspond to the areas which sit in the grooves of the reel. Is there any chance the reel is a little too tight for the film & the chemicals just weren't able to get to the film?

    My chemicals are still fairly new & I didn't change my method. However I loaded the film onto a 'new' film reel that I've borrowed from the university's darkroom via the photographic society. I normally load immediately before developing but my plans had to change & my film was on the reel & safely in the tank for 3 days before today, could that affect it?

    Do I need to wash/re-fix the film? I didn't pre-soak, but I never usually do and I've not seen this before. It's currently hanging up to dry so I'd like to know if I need to do anything or if I can ignore it seeing as it's on the edges of the film (it covers where the frame markings are).

    Thanks,

    Sara

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_20130114_161301.jpg 
Views:	90 
Size:	83.9 KB 
ID:	62701

  2. #2
    fotch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,128
    You photo's indicate that the "chemicals just weren't able to get to the film". I wonder if the 3 day delay was a factor that resulted in the reels contacting the film in such a way it prevented the chemicals from making contact. If not that, then I would suspect the reels. Odd problem.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    florida
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,169
    Images
    2
    I'm not familiar with the reel pictured but could it have been wet when you rolled the film and the film stuck to the reel and as mentioned the chemicals didn't come in contact with that part of the film?

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  4. #4
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,535
    Images
    1
    the fixer did not get to those areas. i'd refix and process from there againjust to be sure.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #5
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,620
    I agree with the consensus. Chemistry did not evenly contact the film. Refix and rewash.

    Watch your agitation and make sure the reels are clean and dry.

    I often use a toothbrush and hot water to clean mine out. Some people recommend putting them into the dishwasher. (Top rack with no drying heat!)

    Inspect the reels to ensure that they are clean, dry and undamaged before using again.

    This reminds me it's probably time for me to do the same!
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    8
    Thanks all

    I've never re-fixed/re-washed before. Apart from using my usual go-to reel & dry the film, do I need to be aware of anything? I fixed for 10 minutes already, so how much longer should I go for? Sorry for all the questions, but I really do appreciate the help!

    I know the reel was dry cos it hasn't been used since I was lent it in November, but I'm half-wondering if the tank itself was still damp when I loaded it. If so I might hold off for another day just to be on the safe side.

  7. #7
    Worker 11811's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,620
    Always fix for the least amount of time necessary to do the job. The longer the film is in the fixer, the more it soaks in, deeper into the emulsion (and paper, if making prints) it gets and the harder it is to remove. The more fixer remains in or on the film, the greater chances of degradation as time passes. One of the biggest problems for film preservation is degradation because enough of the chemicals weren't removed.

    You're using rapid fixer. In my experience, five minutes ought to be enough time with rapid fixer. This assumes that you are using fresh fixer, not recycled, that you use it at the correct dilution and with the right temperature and agitation. If you do everything "normally" and according to the manufacturer's instructions, you've got all this covered.

    However, if the instructions say to fix for ten minutes and you otherwise follow the instructions, ten minutes it is!

    There are ways to determine the exact amount of time needed to correctly fix film, using a clip of undeveloped film and a stopwatch but, for now, let's just do things by the book.

    Other than that, just put the film back on the reels, put it into the tank and pour in the fixer, just as if you were doing it the regular way, for the first time. Make sure you rinse the film the way you usually do and use rinse agent if that's part of your process. Hang the film up to dry as usual and proceed normally from there.

    I suppose you could cut the film apart and redo just the parts that need it. You are probably going to cut the film into short strips anyway. Right? However, it might be wise to refix everything. It could be correct to assume that, if some of the film, didn't get fixed properly that there might be other parts that weren't fixed either. A prudent person might just refix everything just to be safe. How much extra work is it, really?

    Whether you do it today or tomorrow, still, check your reels to be they are clean, dry and undamaged before you process any more film. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Right?
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    882
    Images
    580
    Get rid of your plastic reels and start using stainless. It cut my cursing-at-plastic-reel time from about 20 minutes a week to zero.

  9. #9
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,607
    Quote Originally Posted by supersara2001 View Post
    I've not seen these marks before so I was wondering if anyone could confirm if it's emulsion that wasn't removed properly?
    The emulsion is not to be removed. The emulsion is a mixture out of unsoluble (lightsensitive) crystals, dyes and lot of additives embedded in gelatin. The aim of processing is to change the exposed crystals into metallic silver, de-colour or wash-out the deyes, make those remaining crystals soluble and wash out all soluable stuff, with the silver bound in the gelatin remaining.

    In your case at least the fixing stage did not work locally (indicated by the opaque look of the rebates).

    The optimum remedy would be fixing and washing the film again. As it is only about the rebates, washing again would be sufficient.
    I'm sure though that other members would consider this over the top, and just advise to keep the film as it is.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    544
    Quote Originally Posted by illumiquest View Post
    Get rid of your plastic reels and start using stainless. It cut my cursing-at-plastic-reel time from about 20 minutes a week to zero.
    With respect that's poor advice. Multitudes of people use plastic reels without problems, myself included. If you have a problem with them, the chances are its caused by a faulty operator. I've never used stainless steel tanks but I'm sure they're just a s good as plastic, but I'm equally sure that both systems are fit for purpose.
    testing...

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin