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  1. #11
    titrisol's Avatar
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    according to the photflo MSDS this is what it has:
    Concentrate: 30-40
    Water (007732-18-5) 35-40
    Ethylene glycol (000107-21-1) 25-30
    p-tert-octylphenoxy polyethoxyethyl alcohol (009002-93-1)


    The PTO alcohol should be the main active ingredient, also known as Octoxynol-9, or Triton X-100, used in Hair products (rinse) and other houselhold items.
    The Chemical Info of it is here:
    http://chem.sis.nlm.nih.gov/chemidpl...e/ChemFull.jsp
    Mama took my APX away.....

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I use Agfa Sistan (25ml per litre of water), which does contain formaldehyde I believe. It is a milder wetting agent than PhotoFlo, but it also acts as a preservative for B&W films and RC prints. Ctein recommends Sistan or selenium toning to get the most life out of RC prints. In general I prefer FB papers, but for prints that are going to be handled and that someone might want to put into an album or a desk frame (i.e.--no fancy conservation framing), then RC paper and Sistan isn't a bad compromise.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #13
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    I have used a few drops of dishwashing soap in distilled water.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  4. #14
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loose Gravel
    I have used a few drops of dishwashing soap in distilled water.
    Ditto. Worked fine. If I remember my schooldays correctly wetting agents just lower (or increase, like I said it was a long time ago!) the surface tension of the water enebling it to 'run off' more efficiently. You can buy wetting agents as a 'finisher' for washing cars too. Anything that lowers (or increases?) surface tension should suffice as a wetting agent.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  5. #15
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    Try adding about 25ml of Isopropal Alchohol to your wetting agent, it helps eliminate drying marks. I don't buy the pure alchohol from the chemist I use rubbing compound that I get when I visit the US it's 98% alchohol and costs a fraction the price of the pure stuff in the UK. I used to have real problems with drying marks until I started doing this several years ago. Never had a problem since.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
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    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  6. #16
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    I dry my prints in a home made Senrac(AKA a plastic tube with a hair dryer and filter attatched) and have never had problems with water drops.

  7. #17
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    Fuji-Hunt has this great stuff called Banstatic. It is used in color processing for a final rinse. I put a few drops in at the end of the wash. It not only prevents any watermarks it also makes the film attact less dust. It makes a really big difference in the darkroom.

  8. #18
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    Any chemical that reduces surface tension but does not contaminate such as commercial surfactants; also Calgon. Even 1-drop of dish detergent works well.

  9. #19
    rjr
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    Agfa Sistan

    David,

    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I use Agfa Sistan (25ml per litre of water), which does contain formaldehyde I believe. It is a milder wetting agent than PhotoFlo, but it also acts as a preservative for B&W films and RC prints.
    Sistan contains no formaldehyde - but a wetting agent (probably Triton-X) and Rhodanid/Thiocyanate, which acts in a kind of suicide mission. It protects the colloid silver by reacting with any harmful substance in the air (usually sulphur dioxide).
    Tschüss,
    Roman

  10. #20
    rjr
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    Ed,

    do you mean www.calgon.com with "the stuff in the supermarket"? This is not the Calgon used in photographic chemistry, which is Sodiumhexametaphosphat or "Fotoplex lll".

    BTW, I believe that the "Supermarket Calgon" is snake oil, the Zeoliths in washing detergent will take care of any "hard water minerals" (as they say on their website) in the water.

    I have not that much problem with Formaldehyde, but IIRC all current photographic wetting agent are formaline free. I know for sure that Tetenal Mirasol is... Actually I prefer stabilizer over the wetting agent (hardening the emulsion, biozide, cleaner films), I take care of the formaldehyde in it by appropriate handling and there are formaline free stabis out there, either.

    The rinse aid used in dishwashers isn´t that different from most commercial wetting agents and -unlike dish wash fluid- they contain no perfume, no colors. I remember a friend using it in the rare occasions when his 1l "life time stock" Mirasol bottle was empty. ,-)
    Tschüss,
    Roman

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