Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,222   Posts: 1,532,448   Online: 1166
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    50

    Blotches on film! Storage, development, camera... some thing else?

    Hi

    I had some 35mm film developed (Neopan 400) and some of the images have turned out with 'blotches' (see attachment).

    I had a previous film developed (Ilford HP5) at the same lab, from the same camera and lens, without any issues.

    Initially, I thought that it might be dirt on the lens, as I was taking pictures in a muddy field at one point. But, the blotches are not on all the images and, when they do appear, do not seem to be in the same place each time.

    The films were bought from different shops, so I wondered if it might be a storage issue with the Neopan? Or is it a development issue, or something else? The films are well within expiry dates and I didn't pass through x-rays with them. Does anyone recognise what might have caused this?

    I've attached a detail of the issue (I've enhanced the contrast to show it up better).

    Thanks

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	speckles-close.jpg 
Views:	80 
Size:	362.8 KB 
ID:	62826
    Last edited by Roundabout; 01-16-2013 at 10:20 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: For clarity

  2. #2
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,190
    Images
    12
    You appear to have something growing on your film. Do you live in a tropical region and/or is there any possibility the film might have gotten damp, e.g. refrigeration after unsealing the original foil packaging?

    Have a close look at the neg and see if you can tell whether the additional density is silver or some other substance on the surface of the film.

    Edit: that is definitely a film issue, not a camera issue unless you have a little rainforest going in there.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    50
    Thanks for that, polyglot.

    I bought the film and used it in London (not much rainforest there ) and developed it within a week. It was stored on the shop's shelves and, before using it, I stored it in its case in my bag.

    I'm glad, at least, that it's not my camera. (Should I clean the camera, just in case it's been affected by the film, or should it be OK?)

    I've a couple of rolls left. Is there anything I can do, or should I chuck them? I'll check them for silver density.
    Last edited by Roundabout; 01-16-2013 at 11:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4
    mts
    mts is offline
    mts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    335
    Images
    117
    Looks like a case of reticulation caused by improper processing. Try another roll from the same batch, but not for anything important, and see if it happens again. It could be the lab that processed the film made a chemistry or temperature error, and if so they did not recognize that they had a problem.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,240
    Images
    60
    Either reticulation, or a problem with condensation.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Peak District, Derbyshire, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    263
    Perhaps localised overheating when drying the film, or putting the film under a cold tap? If it isn't happening over the entire film some form of sudden temperature change after it has come out of the chemicals is my theory.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,835
    Its reticulation.

    Temperature error during processing.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  8. #8
    AgX
    AgX is online now

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,504
    Reticulation, though inhomogeneous. What makes it interesting.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    50
    Thanks everyone.

    Yes, the first few images seem to be free from the 'reticulation' (I've learned a new word, thanks). Then it kicks in around image/s 7-10 and continues throughout the film to a greater or lesser degree. One or two images after this appear less or unaffected, but perhaps it is just more obvious on certain types of image.

    So, I'm probaly safe using the rest of the batch? I'll probably keep them aside for less 'crucial' work, just in case.
    Last edited by Roundabout; 01-17-2013 at 05:49 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelling

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,369
    Images
    88
    The batch of film is likely ok, but you may want to do some lab shopping. With your current lab, you should show them the film and see if they will work with you in correcting the problem.
    Some films are more prone to reticulation than others, I think the Fuji films are among those, but I don't know for certain. If you search reticulation in here there should be lots of information.
    Generally, it's caused by sudden temperature changes in processing, either large temp differences between the chems, or, temperature shifts during washing (somewhat more likely).

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin