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  1. #1
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    My first B&W film development - Here we go!

    Wish me luck! this is my first B&W development.

    T-max 100 & 400

    I read that Photo-Flo is not needed with TF-4. Is that correct?

    All recommendations and advice are truly welcome!

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  2. #2

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    Good Morning, Mindthemix,

    Some probably get by without Photoflo. That may depend on the characteristics of your local water supply. I had not heard that the choice of fixer makes any difference. Usually the last solution to hit your film will be a washing aid, to shorten washing time. Several minutes of water wash usually follow. The Photoflo is just a surfactant to help water drain off without leaving spots. If you use Photoflo, be aware that you can probably get by with a much more dilute solution than Kodak recommends; a drop or two in a tank with one 35mm reel should generally be enough.

    Konical

  3. #3
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Konical View Post
    Good Morning, Mindthemix,

    Some probably get by without Photoflo. That may depend on the characteristics of your local water supply. I had not heard that the choice of fixer makes any difference. Usually the last solution to hit your film will be a washing aid, to shorten washing time. Several minutes of water wash usually follow. The Photoflo is just a surfactant to help water drain off without leaving spots. If you use Photoflo, be aware that you can probably get by with a much more dilute solution than Kodak recommends; a drop or two in a tank with one 35mm reel should generally be enough.

    Konical
    Thanks for the advice Konical.

  4. #4

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    Start out by following the directions given by Kodak (and Formulary for TF-4). You can also find excellent papers on Kodak's website about how to develop film and process to high quality.

    Regarding the chemicals in your picture, you don't seem to have a stop bath there. There are differing opinions on whether or not you need to use one, but if you don't, you'll need a proper water rinse after you pour out the developer and before you pour in the fixer.

    TF-4 is an alkaline rapid fixer. I think when you're saying you read you don't need Photo-Flo with TF-4, what you really mean is you don't need a Hypo Clearing Agent with TF-4. Here is the background: After fixing, you need to thouroughly wash the film. Using a Hypo Clearing Agent after the fixer can reduce the washing time. It is said with an alkaline fixer like TF-4 (as opposed to most other rapid fixers which are acidic) the wash times will already be shorter than usual, meaning a Hypo Clearing Agent isn't needed to speed up washing. Having said all this, you don't need to use a Hypo Clearing Agent with film anyway. You just wash the film longer. Again, follow Kodak's directions (and the directions for TF-4).

    Photo-flo is a wetting agent used after the final wash. It helps the film to dry more evenly and prevent drying spots.

  5. #5
    cjbecker's Avatar
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    You are using the same chemo that I just used to develop my last roll. I suggest the photo flo. Hc110 is one of my favorite developers. I use it as dilution b 1-63.

  6. #6
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Start out by following the directions given by Kodak (and Formulary for TF-4). You can also find excellent papers on Kodak's website about how to develop film and process to high quality.

    Regarding the chemicals in your picture, you don't seem to have a stop bath there. There are differing opinions on whether or not you need to use one, but if you don't, you'll need a proper water rinse after you pour out the developer and before you pour in the fixer.

    TF-4 is an alkaline rapid fixer. I think when you're saying you read you don't need Photo-Flo with TF-4, what you really mean is you don't need a Hypo Clearing Agent with TF-4. Here is the background: After fixing, you need to thouroughly wash the film. Using a Hypo Clearing Agent after the fixer can reduce the washing time. It is said with an alkaline fixer like TF-4 (as opposed to most other rapid fixers which are acidic) the wash times will already be shorter than usual, meaning a Hypo Clearing Agent isn't needed to speed up washing. Having said all this, you don't need to use a Hypo Clearing Agent with film anyway. You just wash the film longer. Again, follow Kodak's directions (and the directions for TF-4).

    Photo-flo is a wetting agent used after the final wash. It helps the film to dry more evenly and prevent drying spots.
    Thank you very much fot the advice Michael. Based on previous readings I'll be using water as stop bath.

  7. #7

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    I mix photo-flo 10ml to a gallon. I hang my film in the bathroom. I put the clips on and hold the film over the bathtub, and pour just a little down each side. Then just hang and let dry. It works for me, no spots anyway. Enjoy the process!
    --
    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

  8. #8

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    Use Photo-Flo (or the Arista, etc. version) unless it's specifically indicated NOT TO USE by the manufacturer of the other chemicals. For example, I think those C41 development kits require you to make the final wash the stabilizer wash, or else your negatives will start to look funny after a few months.

    I hang film in my shower as well, never had a problem with spotting when using Photo-Flo. I dump the solution right into the open developing tank and carry it into my bathroom. I gently remove the film from the reels, dunk it in the solution, and pull it out from one end slowly and then hang the film from that starting end. This gives a bit of "wicking" action that takes off most of the solution anyhow, and I've never needed to squeegee.

  9. #9
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    Thank you everyone for all the great tips and advice on my journey. I'll post the result for sure.

  10. #10
    mindthemix's Avatar
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    Finally my "keepers"

    First things first. Thank you everyone for all your feedback and knowledge, I've learned more with your replies than hours of reading.

    The experience was super (my wife and 5 years old son has joined the party), and the smell of film, mmm...sexy.

    Summary:

    Camera: Yashica Lynx 14E
    Film : Kodak T-Max 400
    Developer: Kodak HC-110 (@75F)- Dil B
    Stop Bath: Water
    Fixer: TF-4



    • Presoak: 1 minute (mixed feelings here)
    • Development: 4.5 minutes (30 seconds agitation then 5 inversions every 30 seconds)
    • Stop Bath: 1 minute (continuous agitation)
    • Fix: 6 minutes (5 inversions once a minute)
    • Final wash: 5 minutes
    • Soak in PhotoFlo: 1 minute


    I messed with the exposure so no a lot of keepers this time, but I think the development came out really good. At east I have pictures on film!

    Feedback are extremely welcome. More rolls tonight.

    Note: The fixer ends up with a reddish tint to it. Is that normal? Thanks!
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    Last edited by mindthemix; 01-27-2013 at 07:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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