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  1. #11

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    Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #12

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    I wonder how Kodak solved these two problems.... Dektol comes in one packet all mixed up. Did they coat chemical granules so they dissolve in the right order AND doesn't interfere from some not dissolving because something else is already in the solution??
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #13

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    Kodak spent a lot of money and time on research to come up with a single powder mix. Kodak has many patents on this problem. This is why Ilford's ID-11 comes in two bags but D-76 comes in just one. Each chemical may need a different approach. For example, very finely divided boric oxide is used to coat such alkalies as sodium carbonate. All the chemicals must be completely anhydrous. Even a small amount of moisture will cause the powder mix to spoil. The chemicals are also packaged under nitrogen.

    When Acufine first appeared the cans started exploding on the store shelves. The developer had to be reformulated.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 01-18-2013 at 12:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I wonder how Kodak solved these two problems....
    To get some perspective look at this catalog of photo chemicals from some German supplier, and take note that Kodak most likely has a stash of muchmore convoluted and obscure and diverse compounds ready to use but which they won't trade publicly. If you can formulate and make modern fine grain ISO 400 color negative film, formulating one part D-76 is trivial in comparison.

    This likely means we can't do this in our kitchen with supplies form Artcraft and Formulary. Sometimes we amateurs have to improvise, and mixing D-72 from two or even three powder parts and water seems not that much of a hassle.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

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