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  1. #1

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    ISO Mistake, how to correct in development ? profesional advised needed.

    I was shooting ISO 100 film and spot metering with hand held Light meter. I had my light meter set to ISO 100. all good. I was metering middle gray so I expect my mettering to be accurate for my scene. Then I decided to switch to another film ISO 400 but forgot to set my light meter to match the ISO. I shot almost the entire new roll metering with light meter set to ISO 100. The camera however was set correctly at ISO 400 (which is irrelevant since I was using light meter to set my exposure manually). This translates that I am pretty much ~two stops overexposure for most of the roll. I was shooting Kodak Tri-X 400 . The scene I was shooting was an overcast morning with very dense fog at sunrise. Light did not make it through the fog, so in general it was a low contrast scene as it is.

    My question is: How can I correct this mistake in development ?. I think the answer is PULLING two stops during development (assuming I still have detail in the highlights). As I am no expert on this, I'd like to get some advise. Is this the right solution. ? I believe I have to lower development time to accomplish this, but this will cause lose of contrast, right ?. I am hoping not to lose too much more contrast due to already low contrast scene as described above. Should I pull one stop only ? then I am thinking I will need to use a higher contrast paper/filter to increase the the contrast during printing ? I print on VC Ilford B&W paper. I use Kodak D-76 as my developer, is there another developer that can help in this situation and how ?
    I also heard of intensification and reduction processes but not sure if that can play a roll here ?

    These should be good images of the Everglades in Southern Florida. I have to do what it takes to rescue the images.

    Thanks in advance.
    Luis


  2. #2

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    So you over exposed Tri-X by 2 stops and the scene was low in contrast to begin with. (meaning tonal range was narrow)

    If you PULL this, meaning develop shorter, you will end up with really flat negative - even flatter than the scene itself.
    If you process this normally, you will end up with dense negative but with expected contrast. On the plus side, you'll have good shadow detail.
    On the negative side, you risk losing highlight - BUT you said it was a low contrast scene, so I assume there were no extremes. Tri-X can do much more than 10 zones, you may just be taking advantage of this...

    Recalling your scene, were there any extreme in highlight? If so, was it sufficient to reach the high end of tonal range of the negative itself?? You said low contrast and foggy. So I'm guessing no.

    If no, I'd just develop it normally and just expect long exposure in printing time.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #3

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    Oh, yeah, welcome to APUG, fellow Floridian!
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I'd just develop it normally and just expect long exposure in printing time.
    What I was going to say...

  5. #5
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    pulling is the proper thing to do, you're contrast will be different that it should be, but you'll get your image back to a better exposure, the thing about pushing and pulling is that you won't fully get the same image, changing the development messes with the highlighs but not the evenness of a photo so you may have a really non-contrasty image

    I also may be off on exactly what the development does to the film, but that's basically it, so yes, pull two stops and save the image.

  6. #6

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    Well....

    Tri-X has something like 16 stops of usable exposure range.
    OP said foggy flat scene which probably means like 8 or less stops of range.
    Properly exposing it will place it in the lower half of the film's total range....
    He over exposed it so it shifted UP by two stops which really isn't a big deal.

    Development time changes the contrast of the film. If he pulls it by 2 stops, it'll really be flat.... it was flat to begin with. He will have to compensate it when printing, if that's even possible.

    Assuming my assumption about the scene is right, he isn't hurting anything by developing it normally.... it's still well within the film's capability. He'll have a bit longer exposure at the printing time but contrast will be pretty normal. He may have to boost it just a little, if that's necessary.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #7
    MattKing's Avatar
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    As your scene is a low contrast scene in the first place, you probably don't want to reduce the contrast further.

    You indicate that you were metering on the middle grey values. With a low contrast scene, that means to me that with normal exposure, you won't come close to "using up" the highlight room that Tri-X gives you.

    Two stops of extra exposure will just push everything up the curve, but as your scene was low contrast to start with, most likely there is room up there for your highlights (if you develop normally).

    What film format were you shooting? I ask, because the increased exposure may increase the grain - not a great problem for LF, but of concern if you are shooting half-frame 35mm.

    EDIT: I need to take typing lessons.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #8
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    Listen to them not me, they know more than I do...

  9. #9
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    If I did this in bright sun with harsh shadows (the kind of light I often get shooting street photos), I might pull one stop, or develop normally and expect my highlights to be a little crispy. But for foggy/overcast scenes, I think Tri-X should be fine developed normally.

  10. #10

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    You did fine. Develop normally. Pulling will reduce local contrast.

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