Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,832   Posts: 1,582,319   Online: 984
      
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 42
  1. #31
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,530
    Images
    65
    Well, I refer to bubbles forming at any stage of the processing procedure, and with any type of product, film and paper both.

    PE

  2. #32
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,556
    Images
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Well, I refer to bubbles forming at any stage of the processing procedure, and with any type of product, film and paper both.

    PE
    I find that the most difficult aspect of that is print washing. Knowing that I have to replace my water heater soon, I observe that when I flush hot water in the winter there are a lot of micro bubbles, almost to the point that it looks like purposely aerated water. My only solution for true archival print washing at the time being is to use a tray and a siphon. The siphon breaks up many of those micro bubbles, and I can physically intervene and move the prints around in the tray in order for them to wash properly. My 'archival' print washer from Versalab isn't working very well in the winter because of those micro bubbles. The nozzles that inject wash water in each of the print slots do not break up the micro bubbles like the siphon does, so within a couple of minutes the entire print surface is full of air bubbles. It simply does not work well.

    The cold water in my tap in the winter is around 40 degrees F, so it takes a lot of hot water in order to bring the water temp up to temperature of efficient washing.

    I know what I have to do to solve this problem, but just driving home your point with an example, showing that it's absolutely necessary to pay attention to it.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #33
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,530
    Images
    65
    There is a screw on tip for any threaded water tap that will help fix this problem. It is essentially a vacuum or suction tip that uses the Bernoulli effect to suck air into the water stream. We used the vacuum, but Jobo has a device that uses it to reduce bubbles and the screw on tap does the same.

    I have not seen one in stores recently, but they resemble a "T" where one side of the top of the "T" screws into the tap and the water exits the other side. Air enters the base, and breaks up the tiny bubbles and creates a vacuum at the same time. The inside of the top of the "T" is constricted in such a way as to create the Bernoulli effect. The exit flow of water + air is quite forceful, so you have to take care not to overdo the flow rate.

    Same goes for the Jobo washer.

    PE

  4. #34
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,784
    However you agitate, be consistent. A consistant process is way more important than exactly how you do it, as long as you have even development and no bell marks.

  5. #35
    mindthemix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Miami
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    134

    Finally my "keepers"

    First things first. Thank you everyone for all your feedback and knowledge, I've learned more with your replies than hours of reading.

    The experience was super (my wife and 5 years old son has joined the party), and the smell of film, mmm...sexy.

    Summary:

    Camera: Yashica Lynx 14E
    Film : Kodak T-Max 400
    Developer: Kodak HC-110 (@75F) - Dil B
    Stop Bath: Water
    Fixer: TF-4


    • Presoak: 1 minute (mixed feelings here)
    • Development: 4.5 minutes (30 seconds agitation then 5 inversions every 30 seconds)
    • Stop Bath: 1 minute (continuous agitation)
    • Fix: 6 minutes (5 inversions once a minute)
    • Final wash: 5 minutes
    • Soak in PhotoFlo: 1 minute


    I messed with the exposure so no a lot of keepers this time, but I think the development came out really good. At east I have pictures on film!

    Feedback are extremely welcome. More rolls tonight.

    Note: The fixer ends up with a reddish tint to it. Is that normal? Thanks!
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scan_435.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	507.2 KB 
ID:	63224Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scan_447.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	512.0 KB 
ID:	63225Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scan_453.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	551.3 KB 
ID:	63226Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scan_438.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	578.9 KB 
ID:	63227Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scan_452.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	647.5 KB 
ID:	63228
    Last edited by mindthemix; 01-27-2013 at 08:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #36
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,269
    Images
    67
    All-RI-I-IGHT! You're on your way!

  7. #37
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,530
    Images
    65
    Very nice. Kudos.

    PE

  8. #38
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,556
    Images
    300

    Kodak HC-110 & TF-4 / Gentle or Vigorous Agitation?

    Nice pictures!

    It's normal for the fix to come out with a tint after fixing TMax. That color clears after a while.
    You will also notice that as your fixer gets older and used it will turn a slight golden tint. This is also normal.

    Have fun!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #39
    mindthemix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Miami
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    134

    My second try and the third T-Max roll

    Olympus OM-1n / Zuiko 21mm F/3.5
    Yellow filter

    Film : Kodak T-Max 100


    Developer: Kodak HC-110 (@75F) Dilution H
    Stop Bath: Water
    Fixer: TF-4


    Presoak: 1 minute
    Development: 10 minutes (30 seconds agitation then 5 inversions every 30 seconds)
    Stop Bath: 1 minute (continuous agitation)
    Fix: 6 minutes (5 inversions once a minute)
    Final wash: 8 minutes
    Soak in PhotoFlo (two drops): 1 minute

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Epons_Scan_513.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	710.5 KB 
ID:	63288Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Epons_Scan_512.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	541.3 KB 
ID:	63289Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Epons_Scan_511.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	603.8 KB 
ID:	63290Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Epons_Scan_509.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	531.7 KB 
ID:	63291Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Epons_Scan_500.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	771.7 KB 
ID:	63293
    Last edited by mindthemix; 01-28-2013 at 10:54 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #40

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    496
    I just crawled out of the darkroom and saw this second set of pictures and had to comment. Great job! It almost makes me want to go back to using HC-110. By looking at the stump shot I'd say you nailed the exposure perfect. Also, your camera combo is first rate. I owned a 21mm f3.5 at one time and do believe it was the best wide angle I have ever used and I have used a few. The 21mm f4 Konica Hexanon is a very close second. There is so much nice gear out there at very reasonable prices now. I just hope we can get film for those goodies for a while. JohnW

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin