Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,549   Posts: 1,544,641   Online: 726
      
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 42
  1. #1
    mindthemix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Miami
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    134

    Kodak HC-110 & TF-4 / Gentle or Vigorous Agitation?

    My first development experience and my plan as follows:

    Film: T-Max 100 & 400

    • Development / 68F
      • TIME: 6 minutes
      • Agitate vigorous for 30 seconds, then 5 seconds (2 gentle inversions) every 30 seconds.
      • About 15 seconds before the time is up, pour out developer.

    • Rinse / 68F running water
      • TIME: 1 minute

    • Fix / 68F
      • TIME: 6 minutes, with 5 inversions once a minute

    • Final Wash / 68F running water
      • TIME: 5 minutes.

    • Soak in a wetting agent
      • TIME: 1 minute with agitation.

    • Hang the film to dry.


    I have thousands of questions but my main concern at this point is the agitation. There's mixed point of views and I'd really appreciate your advice. Please correct my times if you think I'm wrong with my recipe.

    Thanks in advance for all your help.

  2. #2
    Pioneer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Elko, Nevada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,017
    Images
    4
    Every 30 seconds I agitate 7 times in 5 seconds. Try it, that's pretty vigorous.

  3. #3
    Greg Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Crestview Hills, KY
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,923
    I follow Kodak's instructions of 5-7 inversions at the beginning, then 3-5 every thirty seconds. It works very well for me.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  4. #4
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,289
    Images
    301
    Just like developing time, developer concentration, and developer temperature, agitation is a tool that you can use to affect the results you get.
    You can choose to ignore this, and develop the same every time, but it's good to know that how you agitate will change your negatives.

    Basically, what happens is this: If you agitate often, you will develop your highlights faster. In the highlights is where your negative received most light exposure, and the developer will exhaust quicker there than in the shadows (which are thin on the negative). When you agitate you replenish with fresh developer across the entire film surface, so there is fresh developer in contact with the highlight areas of your negatives more often. That accelerates the development rate of your highlights in relation to the shadows. Make sense?

    Conversely, if you agitate less frequently, say 10 seconds every three minutes, you retard the rate at which the developer develops the highlights in relation to shadows. I hope you see the pattern. There are no rules for how you SHOULD develop your film, just guidelines, which usually produces a technically decent result, and it's a good place to start. All I'm saying is that how you agitate will have an effect on the outcome, and it is you who should decide what your negatives are like since it is you who are going to use them to make prints.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #5
    Jeff L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Toronto ON
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    491
    I agree. No rules, just guidelines.
    I agitate for first 30 and for 5 inversions every minute. Works well for me. I wonder about the definition of vigerous agitation. That can mean a very different thing to different people. I wouldn't recommend shaking the hell out of the tank. Ofcourse that's just a guideline.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,601
    I never agitate vigorously in the sense of shaking the tank. I tap the bottom of it at the start of the cycle to clear any airbells, then reverse tip it upside-down twice every 30 secs, rather gently, like
    the old Kodak manuals depicted.

  7. #7
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,026
    Images
    65
    Don't forget that a prewet always helps, and don't forget to tap the tank at the start of any step to dislodge any air bubbles that are trapped on the surface of the film.

    PE

  8. #8
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,289
    Images
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I never agitate vigorously in the sense of shaking the tank. I tap the bottom of it at the start of the cycle to clear any airbells, then reverse tip it upside-down twice every 30 secs, rather gently, like
    the old Kodak manuals depicted.
    I got so carried away with my response that I forgot about the very basics of answering the OP's question. Yes, I too never agitate in crazy manners, gentle full tank inversion does it. I use a 10s every minute as standard, and manage three full inversions in that time, plus giving the tank a couple of taps against the counter top (to get rid of air bubbles), before I set the tank to rest again.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #9
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,237
    Images
    65
    I do use HC110 almost exclusively, but have shot very little Tmax. I do not pre-wet; I invert maybe a dozen times or so for about the first 30 seconds, accompanied by a thump or three on the table to dislodge bubbles. I then do about four inversions (~5 sec) every minute. I rotate the tank about one third between each inversion.

    In fixer I tend to agitate more continuously, albeit not as rapidly -- maybe an inversion every five seconds. I assume TF-4 is a rapid fixer, as the old traditional hypo will likely take upwards of ten minutes.

    To me, five minutes sounds short for a wash unless you also use a hypo clear bath. Kodak describes 20 to 30 minutes. I usually wash twenty minutes -- but that is usually longer because I wander off and forget ...

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,052
    Agitation varies a lot from person to person. It also affects development quite strongly. The object is to find a scheme that works well for you and then to be consistent. The Kodak recommendations are a good starting point. You may, however, have to adjust the developing time a little because of the individual way you do the agitation.

    Fixing goes to completion, so agitation has a less noticeable effect. I go the vigorous route in the fix, just to be sure.

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin