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  1. #1

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    B&W Film Storage

    I do not have the ability to develop at the moment. Hopefully I will within the next month or so. I am keeping both exposed and unexposed rolls in the refrigerator inside their plastic cases AND inside a plastic tupperware container. Is this ok for the time being until i develop?

    Also, I am spending quite a bit of time photographing in cold weather (-5 F here today!). When I return from the cold and head into a heated house, is it ok the leave a half used roll in the camera inside or should I try to expose an entire roll with the temperature variations?

  2. #2

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    Here's what I do personally with my B&W films.

    I keep most of my NEW films in ziploc bags and in my refrigerator.
    I keep some in my closet so I can use them right away.
    Once exposed, they stay in room temperature.
    I always try to finish my roll per shoot/outing but not always successful.

    I NEVER even thought about temp variations in a roll. But I would think, if you are coming from/going to extreme temp variations, you might want to wait until temp equalizes before you do anything with them. Condensation can ruin a lot of things. Other than that, I don't think I'd care too much. Yeah, I would leave film in my camera with no concerns. Just not shoot with it right away.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #3
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    Once refigerated, the film needs to be protected from Condensation. When Bringing a cold camera in, ideal situation is to put it into a small ziplock style bag outside so the condensation does not form on the camera or on the film. (let everything get up to room temperature before opening the bag.) Likwise if you do wnat to refigerate exposed film, keep it in a tightly sealed bag in the fridge and until it reaches room temperature.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by mporter012 View Post
    I do not have the ability to develop at the moment. Hopefully I will within the next month or so. I am keeping both exposed and unexposed rolls in the refrigerator inside their plastic cases AND inside a plastic tupperware container. Is this ok for the time being until i develop?

    Also, I am spending quite a bit of time photographing in cold weather (-5 F here today!). When I return from the cold and head into a heated house, is it ok the leave a half used roll in the camera inside or should I try to expose an entire roll with the temperature variations?

    As far as I'm aware your only concern is condensation. I put my film in the FREEZER not the fridge. I take it out and let it warm up to room temperature and then open it. I use 120 film so it always comes individually wrapped in water proof containers so I freeze and thaw it with impunity. I have never had a problem with condensation. I actually don't bother defrosting it before developing it. I mean you are going to put it in water anyway so some condensation isn't going to hurt.

    So yeah freezer before and after I shoot it.

  5. #5
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    I have found that the dire 'need' to protect from condensation to be theoretically sound, but overplayed in real life. I give not a thought to taking out ten feet from a bulk roll directly from the freezer. I have had no problems, but I do this quickly.

    With traditional B&W film the things to watch out for are heat (do not place on the radiator, ever), but room temp is fine for years. and film speed. 400 will lose speed faster than will Pan F. But even with 400 film months, even a year or two, at a comfortable room temp should pose no problem for either exposed or not exposed. NOTE: I have NEVER in my life seen an honest 800 come from TMZ. (I have seen this seen with Ilford 3200, however.) - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 01-25-2013 at 04:48 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by mporter012 View Post
    I do not have the ability to develop at the moment. Hopefully I will within the next month or so. I am keeping both exposed and unexposed rolls in the refrigerator inside their plastic cases AND inside a plastic tupperware container. Is this ok for the time being until i develop?

    Also, I am spending quite a bit of time photographing in cold weather (-5 F here today!). When I return from the cold and head into a heated house, is it ok the leave a half used roll in the camera inside or should I try to expose an entire roll with the temperature variations?
    Why not ask the experts?
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consu...fo/e30/e30.pdf

  7. #7
    cmacd123's Avatar
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    When I get behind, I often let film sit in my "to be developed" bin for several months without any apperent problems.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville



 

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