Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,767   Posts: 1,516,490   Online: 878
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    NW Chicagoland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    551
    Images
    1
    I've forgotten this. Can someone explain why the tone of the paper changes in relation to developement time. I recall that warmtone papers are warmer with less development time. I thought it had something to do with how the different paper silver grains developed at different times. So is it true the longer the development time the colder the look? And why?

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    South Norfolk, United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,859
    Images
    62
    I'm not sure about that, but developers do not always act in consistently the same way with various papers. for example, it is not possible to say that D-72 / Dektol (an excellent formula) ought to be used to achieve a "standard" result across multiple paper types.

    Tom
    Last edited by Tom Kershaw; 01-31-2013 at 09:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
    Rudeofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,535
    Images
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by ChuckP View Post
    I've forgotten this. Can someone explain why the tone of the paper changes in relation to developement time. I recall that warmtone papers are warmer with less development time. I thought it had something to do with how the different paper silver grains developed at different times. So is it true the longer the development time the colder the look? And why?
    If I remember correctly, warm tone comes from smaller grains in the paper. We know from film developing that shorter dev times yield smaller grain.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,432
    Complete dev will give larger silver grains which tend to cooler tone in these kinds of paper/dev combinations. Premature "snatch" dev tends warmer. Another trick I often use with VC papers when I want cooler tones is to dev the original neg itself a little soft so that the paper needs to be exposed with more blue or magenta light, since in most cases, the higher contrast layer seems to have bigger silver grains and tend colder (hence the ability of some papers to split tone if you work the rules accordingly. Everything depends on the specific paper and dev of course; so you need to test.

  5. #15
    zsas's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    1,959
    Images
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by ChuckP View Post
    I've forgotten this. Can someone explain why the tone of the paper changes in relation to developement time. I recall that warmtone papers are warmer with less development time. I thought it had something to do with how the different paper silver grains developed at different times. So is it true the longer the development time the colder the look? And why?
    Massive kudos to Apug member smieglitz for doing an amazing test of the various toners on warm paper! Check this gem out (subscribers only since this is in the Gallery):
    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/showima...&searchid=7463
    Andy

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin