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  1. #21
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    How to repackage 36 exposures film roll to smaller rolls?

    Remember to check your felt light traps before taping the two rolls together. Also many compact cameras use short leaders and if you are very careful when loading you can get a few extra frames. I think the initial leader that becomes the end of the roll when it gets rerolled would be the most wasteful part of this.

    I have used a similar concept for shooting 35mm films in medium format cameras where you cannot rewind film and need that 2nd spool to hold your exposed film for removal.

  2. #22
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Bottom line: eight exposures is precisely one foot of film (plus leader and trailer). - David Lyga

  3. #23

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    This topic is of particular interest to me as an astrophotographer. The film I use only comes in 36 exposure rolls and these might take 3 or 4 months to shoot given the number of available clear and moon free nights. In the meantime I cannot obtain the feedback needed to adjust exposure times and settings for a given subject. A 100 foot roll would probably take the rest of my life to shoot. It seems to me the best solution is to simply shoot 10 or so pictures and open the camera in a dark room, cut the film and remove the cartridge. Then attach a reloadable cartridge to the exposed film end, close the camera and simply wind up the exposed frames as usual. I have done this before when a roll was accidentally broken while rewinding. It is no big deal and takes only a few minutes. The only downside is that dividing a long roll into several parts will increase the processing costs since each part has to be processed separately.
    Astrojmn

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Astrojmn View Post
    This topic is of particular interest to me as an astrophotographer. The film I use only comes in 36 exposure rolls and these might take 3 or 4 months to shoot given the number of available clear and moon free nights. In the meantime I cannot obtain the feedback needed to adjust exposure times and settings for a given subject. A 100 foot roll would probably take the rest of my life to shoot. It seems to me the best solution is to simply shoot 10 or so pictures and open the camera in a dark room, cut the film and remove the cartridge. Then attach a reloadable cartridge to the exposed film end, close the camera and simply wind up the exposed frames as usual. I have done this before when a roll was accidentally broken while rewinding. It is no big deal and takes only a few minutes. The only downside is that dividing a long roll into several parts will increase the processing costs since each part has to be processed separately.
    Astrojmn
    Welcome to the forum Astrojimn, as a good thought, I would suggest reading the rest of the responses before putting in input, this has already been suggested and it does work. thanks for the input though, however as far as processing cost, as long as you're using something simple like HC-110 or Rodinal, your cost is minimal, its about 10 cents per development for either of those two ... best of luck with the super moon

  5. #25

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    I have long remembered an article in a US photomag , back in the 70's ,called "So,you think you know your camera ?"
    Great mags then- three pages with ray-traces and pictures explaining why,for exceptional results,"a Lens Hood is essential". Anyway,I digress..

    A couple of samples .. 1) without looking at the camera, set it to 1/60 sec,and f/5.6
    2) Load,and unload your camera,in complete darkness.

    The implication being you were just "futzing " (sp?) around in photography unless you had the "street smarts". The point,if you can do 2), you can close the camera back after removing your exposed strip, and not lose any frames at all..

  6. #26
    AgX
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    The most conveniant way:

    Get yourself the quite basic Exa or Exa 1a. It yields the ability to substitute the take-up spool for a type 135 cassette.
    Though you need a reloadable one as you have to twist its spool.

    With the advanced Exacta this might work too, even with standard cassettes, but you should check whether the mouth of the cassettes does not interfere with the sprocket wheel.
    Last edited by AgX; 06-24-2013 at 01:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by jernejk View Post
    I've came up with a DIY "film repackager".

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jernej_...in/photostream

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jernej_...in/photostream

    The first roll is waiting to be developed... So I don't know yet if it is completely safe (but should be).
    Ohhh....lovely design! I used your model as an inspiration, added a handle from a broken Watson bulk loader I had, top box = Zataran's jambalaya, mac'n cheese = bottom box.....Velcro strap to hold the rest together...



    Andy

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