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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by arzon View Post
    I have a box of 94D098 and yes, bag A is light-brownish in color. After mixing, the stock solution looks like piss. I wonder if this is usable.
    Hi Arzon,

    Freshly-mixed ID-11 always "looks like piss" so it should be perfectly useable. I've used ID-11 when it has darkened by oxygen exposure to a golden brown colour and still had good results. To get a rough idea you can cut off a small strip of 35mm leader, fog it and drop it into a receptacle containing the developed you want to test. If it turns black within the time stated on the developer chart it should be good to go. The only way you'll know for sure is to develop an unimportant film with it and see what happens.

    Cheers,
    kevs
    testing...

  2. #22
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    I have had some darker than expected ID11 in a 5L pack

    However, I did a leader development test v some other ID11 which was the regular pale straw and everything was fine.

    So I used it as usual and again everything was fine.

    I cannot tell the difference between my slightly darker than usual ID11 negatives and some pale straw ID11 negs

    YMMV

    Martin

  3. #23

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    It is probably wise to always filter any processing chemical made up from powder before using it. For over thirty years I've been using a funnel with a small piece of pharmaceutical grade cotton-wool stuffed down the spout . . . not the same piece, obviously

    Even on clean looking liquid there are almost always specks to see in the cotton-wool plug before it gets thrown away.

  4. #24

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    kevs:
    You are right, I just did some tests and the developer is usable.

  5. #25
    dances_w_clouds's Avatar
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    I just mixed up a batch of ID-11 and my filter funnel plugged up once during the final transfer into the final container. Bits of black specks that seem to not dissolve. I checked the batch # and it was the 94D098. Nothing can be done after it is mixed. Definitely will be watching this tread. Will post the outcome.

  6. #26
    dances_w_clouds's Avatar
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    ID-11

    The developer seems to do well. I just did 2 rolls of Delta 100 (EI50) and the negatives look OK. It is just I have never had ID-11 so dark before.
    Last edited by dances_w_clouds; 06-03-2013 at 10:17 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by HTF III View Post
    I contend that you could put a teaspoon full of sand in your developing tank when you pour in the developer and it would make no difference. I also contend that Eastman Kodak Co quite possibly has historically the highest quality control of any company since the Industrial Revolution began. Ilford can't be far behind. I still say the developer would have worked fine. Hell, even Kodak D-76, Dektol, Fixer had black specks at the bottom of a mix. I never once had it show up anywhere in the finished work.Be glad these few companies even make this stuff any more. If you bang them over the head because it isn't perfect, they'll quit making it. Some things are just not worth the guff the customers give you.
    I contend that you are not correct. I recently had the experience of black flakes in fixer, which I didn't notice because it was kept in a black light-tight plastic bottle. I only noticed it when pouring in the last bit of liquid into the developing tank, and immediately poured it out again and washed the film as well as I could and refixed with freshly mixed fixer. Well, it turns out that the film was ruined as the flakes stuck to the emulsion and I could not get it to let go. It looked fine, but on closer inspection there are hundreds of specks on every frame. The worst I could PS out after scanning, but for darkroom printing it will not be worth the hassle. So, no thank you to any particulate matter in my developing solutions. In fact, it is not a bad idea to filter stock solutions in any event. It takes a bit of extra equipment and it can be a slow process to filter out very fine gunk, so one doesn't want the developer powder to be the source of the problem for sure.

    Edit: I would think that Ilford, like any company, makes products for as long as it is profitable for it to do so. Any non-conformance is important to know about, because it may relate to one of their suppliers having difficulties, or a change of personnel in their plants etc. The list of possibilities is long, and the feedback we give will help them to isolate the problem so it can be dealt with. This is not "banging over the head" as you call it. It is attempting to give direct, to the point feedback of the problem with the particular batch of product. If I were in Ilford's position, I'd be thankful for those who are giving feedback, as opposed to those who just silently decide to ditch the product and discourage others from using it. There is nothing wrong with ID-11 in general, so it is pointless trying to imply that photographers will stop using it based on one questionable batch.
    Last edited by dorff; 06-04-2013 at 01:52 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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