Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,834   Posts: 1,582,392   Online: 910
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,556
    Images
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by henry finley View Post
    Any special reason for using Rodinal? Personally I thought it was grainy as heck when I tried it.
    It depends on how you use it. With proper technique in exposing film and processing it, Rodinal doesn't have to be any more grainy than HC-110 or D76.

    And, there is so much more to a film developer (and how you use it) than grain. Many people love it for the tonality that's possible with it. Others love the beautiful grain it yields, which is sort of 'organic' looking. Many love the ease of use and storage possibilities with it literally lasting for decades in the bottle, even opened. Etc ad nauseum.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,066
    +1 on everything Thomas just said.
    Also, remember that agitation methods and frequency have everything to do with contrast in developing film. As suggested, take off 10% - 20% off of your own time and, using your own technique, work your way down to the right time. If you are getting good even development with 120 film and Rodinal, I would keep the agitation scheme the same.
    You could even blow a whole roll on one shot, cut the film in half, and try two times (new developer each time). Even if not perfect, you should be able to interpolate.

  3. #13
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,141
    Images
    298
    +1 on everything Thomas and George just said! Can't go wrong following that advice.

  4. #14
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,594
    I may recommend to test the film atlesat.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma, USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    681
    I just developed 120 FP-4 at 80. Developed in Rodinal, 1:50, 20c, 16m. Metal 4 reel tank with the film and one spacer reel. 4 inv first 30 sec. 2 inv each min. 8 of the 16 cycles I invert the tank once at 30s. Negatives look nice but have a touch too much contrast for a condenser enlarger. May work on a diffused light source. The Jan light conditions in central OK were light open shadows. G3.

    On the print I wish the shadows were more open and there were more mid tones. Image included aged cedar patio wood and store front window with white lettering on the window. Wood printed too dark as I tried to hold highlight detail at the right tonality. I get more consistent results with D76. But when a Rodinal neg is right, it looks great.
    Last edited by Richard Jepsen; 01-31-2013 at 09:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    RJ

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    597
    I just got in the habit of half my film speed. It worked for a long time but now I want to take even more control. So, I will try 80 as well. I just now figure out that I had been overdeveloping. Some of negatives are very dense and are very difficult to print.
    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

    Canon A-1, Canon AE-1, Canon Canonet GIII 17, Argus 21, Rolleicord Va, Mamiya RB67, Voigtländer Bessa

    http://darkroom317.deviantart.com/

  7. #17
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,796
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Darkroom317 View Post
    I just got in the habit of half my film speed. It worked for a long time but now I want to take even more control. So, I will try 80 as well. I just now figure out that I had been overdeveloping. Some of negatives are very dense and are very difficult to print.
    Define difficult.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma, USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    681
    I might add I was printing on Galerie G3 with PQ 1:10 developer. You can adjust contrast by diluting Rodinal and agitation. Adding variables makes it more difficult to nail the negative contrast. In general, Rodinal will change the tonal balance vs film developed in D-76. Expect shadows and the zone IV to V mid tones to be darker. On the other hand highlights like bright skies will easily print. Under a grain focuser, Rodinal negatives have sharp grain on MF. But 120 film developed in XTOL 1:2 is also sharp without coarseness. XTOL 120 negs printed at a factor of 5x are sharp and print with clarity.

    The image chriscrawford posted has a typical Rodinal look, strong contrast. Note, Rodinal is agitation sensitive. Ilford data guide says to use 16m with Rodinal 1:50. I think this is too strong a ratio.

    Last year I was experimenting and had these time values with FP-4 and a 1:75 ratio. I think the negatives needed to be developed to about 2/3 grade harder to best print on a condenser.

    I'm using the guidelines in the following article and adjusting from recommended starting points.

    I only use roll film with Rodinal.

    My best negatives which still need tweaks have been with FP4, EI 64, Rodinal 1:75, 11 min, 20c, light conditions winter Oklahoma sun, (4) to (5) inversions the first 20 seconds. (4) gentle inversions each 60s. My developing tank is steel with a (4) or (5) 120 capacity. I load (1) 120 reel and use a 35mm reel for as a spacer. One inversion provides complete mixing of the solution. If I had a smaller tank my agitation would be more frequent to achieve the same results.

    My Rodinal is at least 4/5 years old and recently turned a darker honey from light honey tint.
    I'm not a Rodinal expert, just a casual user. There was a thread last year named; Making The Most of Rodinal. Link takes time to load.

    http://forum.mflenses.com/1979-pop-p...le-t37502.html
    Last edited by Richard Jepsen; 02-01-2013 at 10:03 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    RJ

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bourgogne, France
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    41

    Old Agfa paper

    Here is an old Agfa development sheet. You will find the time, temperature and agitation proposed by Agfa. Hope it helps !
    Attached Files

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Oklahoma, USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    681
    "The average contrast is 0.65 unless otherwise stated. The ISO recommendations should be followed if possible. ** The times for Ilford Delta 3200 have not been tested and are a guide only.
    The RODINAL 1 + 100 times are only recommended for use in hand tanks. There should be a minimum of 250 ml’s of solution for each film in the tank." Agfa Chart

    A key is the average Agfa recommended contrast is 0.65. This may work in flat light but is way off Kodak's recommended 0.56 CI for a diffusion light source.
    RJ

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin