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  1. #11

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    Neal is correct. Read about the working properties, and how exactly to do it, from Kodak.

    The following Kodak publication also discusses replenishment on pages 15-17 (including XTOL).

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...Pubs/o3/o3.pdf

  2. #12
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Replenished XTOL starts as stock solution. For each roll [180 square inches] add 70ml stock solution.

    I pour part of the used XTOL back into the bottle add 70ml*number of rolls stock solution then pour in the rest of the used solution until the volume is 1 liter or 1 Quart.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

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    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #13
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    It doesn't need to start as stock solution you can season it with E-6 First Developer starter, or other starters, instructions in the Kodak datasheet.

    Quote Originally Posted by mexipike View Post
    So I've been reading about replenished Xtol and have a few thoughts that I didn't quite find answered in all the posts I read.

    First here's how I'm thinking I'll set up my system:

    Divide on 5l xtol into working solution and replenisher. After each roll of film I will add 90ml replenisher then top off with the tank after developing.

    I understand that this developer works best after some "seasoning." So I plan to process ten rolls of film of non critical subject matter to get it to that state.

    So there's what I understand, but here's where I have a few questions.

    I like to have a 100 speed film and a high speed film in my arsenal. I have been using acros 100 and think that it would be great in this process. I have a bunch of important rolls of 100 across that need development but I exposed them at 100 iso, It is my understanding that I will lose some speed with this process. Would it be safe to assume that this would give me around 80 ISo with across? What's a good starting point developing time? (35mm ss tank). That may work for my negatives at 100 as I scan them and print in the darkroom so a slightly thinner negative works for me.

    In general if I were to look at the massive developing chart what would be good starting times for the replenished xtol? the 1:2 times?

    As far as high speed film I have been using tri-x pushed in Xtol 1-3 but am not in love with the results, but I love the arista price! I may keep another mix of xtol for using diluted. How does replenished xtol work with something like delta 3200, at around 1000 iso?

    In general what are the advantages and disadvantages of replenished xtol? I understand there is some shadow detail loss. Is there more acutance? If I don't go this route I think I'll use pyrocat hd, but I don't if does much for 35mm.
    It's stock times + 10% iirc according to the Kodak sheet.. generally speaking, but the Kodak sheet does list replenished times.

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
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    One practical advantage that few people reference is that a replenishment regime means that your "working" developer" is always at room temperature - if room temperature is near 20C, this means no temperature adjustment.

    I use replenished HC110 which is more complex than X-Tol, but otherwise very nice.

    If I had a bit more room for storage, I would transition to replenished X-Tol.

    It is so convenient not having to worry about wasting developer, due to the difference between the minimum quantity of developer needed to avoid premature exhaustion vs. minimum quantity required to cover the film in the tank.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    One practical advantage that few people reference is that a replenishment regime means that your "working" developer" is always at room temperature - if room temperature is near 20C, this means no temperature adjustment.

    I use replenished HC110 which is more complex than X-Tol, but otherwise very nice.

    If I had a bit more room for storage, I would transition to replenished X-Tol.

    It is so convenient not having to worry about wasting developer, due to the difference between the minimum quantity of developer needed to avoid premature exhaustion vs. minimum quantity required to cover the film in the tank.
    I, like Matt, used replenished HC-110b, used it for 5 or 6 years and thousands of rolls of film, 95% of it TX. What it did, it did extremely well, but it was very difficult to work with in some regards that no matter how I struggled I couldn't fix, and my work hit a point where I couldn't have those problems.

    Then I tried Tmy2 in replenished xtol. Over the past 6 months I've been working with that. It took me about 50 to 75 rolls to begin to understand it - it is a BIG jump from TX and hc-110b - and a lot of that was getting over old biases and habits as far as a negative and printing, but now that I've begun to figure it out and I can't believe I've been missing it for so long. It's not that it is fully capable as far as making a great photo, almost all films and devs are, it is more that it is extremely easy to work with, from storage, to stability, to mixing, to how it responds to agitation and temp. I'm still a bit stunned at how easy it is compared to what I was doing, and quite frankly, how much better my prints are for it.

    But this is all an aside, back to the OP, the replenishment process is great. Don't get caught up on the stability or the developer loosing it's action...xtol stock has a shelf life of something like 6 months doesn't it? After seasoning it's really really nice in a way that I won't bother trying to explain here since others have done that in other posts. Just give it a try.

  6. #16

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    Replenished X-tol also works well in one of the old Kodak 4x5 hard rubber tanks with a floating lid. I used this system for years, putting either Jobo or Patterson plastic reels on a pair of joined stainless steel rods. The only issue was all the development through fix had to be in the dark. The process was simple - take off the floating lids for X-tol, stop bath, fixer, and Permawash, load the reels, and develop film. It was much quicker than measuring, pouring, etc. The process worked wonderfully well and gave great negs for wet printing or scanning and no appreciable loss of film speed. Replenishing with pouring back and forth isn't as convenient, but it works.

  7. #17
    Maris's Avatar
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    I started my 1.6 litre replenished Xtol batch 6 years ago and it has worked absolutely consistently and predictably ever since. My replenishment rate is 90ml per "standard film". Apart from occasional filtering through a coffee filter it has never needed maintainence. All my films go through this developer; just with different times established by testing.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

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