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  1. #11

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    I already have a squeegee that I use after unloading the film. But it is rubberized, not a sponge one like I was recommended. I currently use a $15 Patterson Rubberized Squeegee.

    I knew my poor math skills would bite me in the butt somewhere in this whole thing. I got the calculation for the 1+200 but I forgot it and didn't realize until later so I improved with 300ml. That's how much chem+water mix is used for 1 roll with developer, stop bath, and fixer. According to the Ilford instructions, I should be using a tablespoon of Ilfotol in 1+200 solution, though. So I did carefully review it, just bad at math...

    I turn on the fan in the bathroom to help get rid of the fumes as the door is light tight shut with electrical tape and towels...so it has nowhere else to go. But this can also get rid of humidity...so is this bad to do?
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

  2. #12

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    Henry...I don't know...my previous rolls were left overnight and completely dry. The PrintFiles are supposedly better than the traditional negative sleeves.
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

  3. #13
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    I'm not sure where you got your instructions from for the Ilfotol.

    The instructions on their website say:

    Mixing instructions and use
    As a final rinse for film we recommend starting with a solution of 5ml of ILFOTOL for each litre of rinse water (1+ 200). The dilution of ILFOTOL needed is dependant on a number of factors and may need some adjustment to get optimum performance for a particular set of circumstances. Performance may vary due the local water quality, the type of processor in use, drying method, etc..
    ...
    We recommend that ILFOTOL is measured and dispensed accurately as either too little or too much wetting agent can lead to uneven drying. Use a graduated pipette or eyedropper if very small quantities are needed. NB the ILFORD 1 litre bottle cap will hold approximately 20ml of ILFOTOL brim full, at 1+200 this is enough wetting agent for 4 litres of water.


    As for the fan in the bathroom, are you doing additional darkroom work while you wait for the film to dry? I usually end up developing film in the evening, and therefore can allow my film to dry over-night in the shower area (with curtain closed).
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14

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    Yeah, sorry. I just realized that I mixed up teaspoon with tablespoon. I hoped no one responded yet. And I re-read the thing too and so I'd need 1L of water plus the teaspoon (5ml).

    Desertratt: I've mentioned that I use Ilfotol. I will definitely try squeegeeing slower too. #2 would go in line with my theory of it being affected by coming into contact with the PrintFile and sticking while still wet. The other two seeme to be due to temperature fchanges.

    Edit: Henry: you've seen others images go to crap due to sleeve-style storage? It seems that sleeves are a very common medium of storage, I wouldn't think there to be an issue. Would the paper of the envelope not risk scratching the negatives?
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

  5. #15

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    Ok, but have you seen this issue with others negatives over the years? Negatives do eventually dry and if they're fully dry (like when I wait 8-10hrs overnight) there should be no issue. Not criticizing, just trying to understand because I've never heard of issues with neg sleeves.
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I have lots of negatives from the 1970s - some in paper/glascine and others in "Printfile" type materials.

    I have kept them dry - they are all in good shape.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    I've had negatives in plastic file pages for at least twenty years without a problem I believe decades back some pages were made with polyethylene and others polypropylene, of which the latter is highly preferred (probably less out-gassing components).

  8. #18

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    Maybe there was once "plastic" and now there is "plastic" but it's different plastic Seriously the modern transparent and genuine neg files like "Clearfile" are fine but yes never put wet negs in such files. It is always worthwhile to run the insides of your fingers up and down the roll after drying. If there is any wetness your skin will detect it. The film should feel as smooth as the baby's proverbial before inserting it into a neg file

    As far as measuring is concerned switch to metric instantly and no more confusion. I bet your fellow Canadians in Quebec are metric as sensibly all our European neighbours are and we in the U.K. are getting there rapidly

    Vive Napoleon!

    pentaxuser

  9. #19

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    Off topic but remember the days when the U.K. used to have a monetary system that had 12 pennies in a shilling and twenty shillings in the pound or eight half crowns in the pound. Oh and we had prices of some articles in things called guineas that were worth 21 shillings!!!!

    American visitors who had a decimalised monetary system used to smile, shake their heads and think we were so quaint which we were or was that backward?

    There really is no way forward except the metric system. Our kids for at least a generation now look askance when I speak of inches, degrees fahrenheit, gallons etc The kids are right and I am part of a measuring system that has about as much place in the 21st century as King Henry VIII having his wives' heads cut off

    Oh and by the way the old way creates problems for newcomers to photography when it comes to measuring things as we have seen and causes mistakes that would be near impossible for a newcomer from the U.K. unless he/she is quite old or almost anywhere in the rest of the world with the U.S. as the major exception.

    pentaxuser

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Maybe there was once "plastic" and now there is "plastic" but it's different plastic Seriously the modern transparent and genuine neg files like "Clearfile" are fine but yes never put wet negs in such files. It is always worthwhile to run the insides of your fingers up and down the roll after drying. If there is any wetness your skin will detect it. The film should feel as smooth as the baby's proverbial before inserting it into a neg file

    As far as measuring is concerned switch to metric instantly and no more confusion. I bet your fellow Canadians in Quebec are metric as sensibly all our European neighbours are and we in the U.K. are getting there rapidly

    Vive Napoleon!

    pentaxuser
    Huh? I am using metric. Last page I was referencing 1L of water + 5mL (aka a teaspoon) of Ilfotol. Metric is very commonplace in Anglo Canada as well. I was referencing temperatures in Celsius. I think the only thing we outright still use imperial for is human height and weight, though this is changing.

    Henry - I could see there being issue if there is water damage and it gets to stored negs. But that's as likely as fire or tornado or extreme heat. This is why I make a point of scanning all my negatives. That way I'm covered from both ends - the natural and technological threats that my photos are exposed to. If there is a fire, I still have photos on an off-site hard drive. If my hard drive crashes, I'll still have the negatives.

    In other news, tonight I'll develop my roll of HP5+ from today, let it dry overnight. Should be fine. I'll be using distilled water and the proper concentrate of Ilfotol this time. It should be dry by tomorrow morning, but I will inspect closely and if I need to rewash blobs, I'll make sure to check the water temp first. Thanks for all your help.
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

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