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  1. #1

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    film base problem with Ilford Hp5 4x5

    Hello,
    I have intermittently experienced a change in the surface of the base on Ilford HP5 4x5 film. Instead of it being very glossy, there appears to be an almost matte surface. Its very disconcerting. I will sometimes get a nice glossy base side, but more often get more of a matte look. I used to use TX and I never experienced this in 35 years. Both films processed exactly the same way, exactly at 67 degrees. Same Sprint Stop and Sprint Fix. The one difference is that instead of d76 i am now using hc110 with the ilford film. This matte issue doesnt always happen. Any ideas?

  2. #2
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    You might send your question to Ilford. http://ilfordphoto.com/contactform.asp
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #3
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    tFalk welcome to APUG. I agree that you should send your question to Ilford. Perhaps Simon R Galley who works for Ilford and posts on APUG will answer a PM for you.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #4

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    Dear tFalk,

    We have had no change in the structure of the base support of HP5+ sheet film, nor in its coating ( its coated front and back ).

    If you have a standard processing procedure it should always look the same.

    A common cause of 'matting' is water held deposits ( hard water areas typically ) or remnants of photoflo, I obviously cannot say this is the cause as I have not seen the neg(s). Typically the emulsion side of the neg should be matt and the reverse glossy.

    If you have any concern you can send an example of the film to us to our technical service at Mobberley in the UK and they will examine your film and reply to you.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  5. #5
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Differences in temperature during processing affect the surface of the gelatin and will cause this, it's important to keep your process cycle constant throughout including washing.

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 02-12-2013 at 06:12 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

  6. #6

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    Was there a change in your final rinse perhaps? Say from tap-water to demineralised, or with/without a surfactant? Or drying in a different orientation or temperature/humidity? It will probably be something like that, or a combination of factors.

  7. #7

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    I agree with Simon Galley it is most likely the water probably calcium carbonate deposits. A simple way to check would be to take a reject negative and wipe the matte affected surface with an acid solution or a household lime deposit cleaner. If it corrects it, it's most likely the the water. Installing a cartridge filter in the water line can help.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  8. #8

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    I don't know if this makes a difference, but I live in a small town with a water treatment plant and every so often I can tell when they are treating a batch. They soften and chlorinate and for a day or so afterwards the water will have a heavy chlorine smell. I have a series of filters in my darkroom system, but still don't do any processing at that time. I'm curious to see what this problem might be. JohnW

  9. #9
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    How are you developing the negs? Drum, trays, hangers?

    I was having similar problems with FP4 in expert drums -- solved it by using a fix without hardened (was using Kodak Rapid Fix, so I left out Part B). My best guess on why is that the antihalation layer was slow to be removed since the back of the film touches the drum. The hardener then hardened or reacted with the remaining antihalation layer.

    Just a guess -- I am just happy that the fixer w/o hardener solved the problem...whatever the problem actually was.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  10. #10

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    I have used 120 films from both Kodak and Ilford for years, and I find that, at least with this format, the Ilford films usually exhibit this more "matte" surface, while Kodak's are always glossy, or shiny.
    It seems to have no effect on printing, so I don't let it bother me. I say "usually" because I no longer pay attention to it, and am using exclusively Ilford film now.

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