Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,706   Posts: 1,548,484   Online: 910
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1
    Usagi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Turku, Finland. Northern Europe.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    360
    Images
    18

    Fuji Acros (sheet) and blotches

    I have recently got weird blotches on my Fuji Acros 4x5 (quickload) sheets.


    It's like a increased fog but not evenly distributed. Instead it's formed from kind of a blotches like this scan sample (about one quarter of sheet) shows. The density of fog is around 0.4 - 0.6 and it's visible everywhere including very edges of the sheet.




    These are visible to bare eye and I really don't know the cause.

    I have found them from negatives developed in Pyrocat-HD and D-76, so it's unlikely developer problem.
    I have processed films on Paterson Orbital tank/daylight tray which is modified like this one: http://www.rogerandfrances.com/photo...20orbital.html


    One cause that I can imagine is roughened base.. But as it's against the base of the film it should not have any effect. It's only for preventing films from sticking on the base and allows some developer/pre soak water flow under the film sheet thus helping removing the antihalation layer.


    The strangest thing is that this does not happen every time. Still the developing procedure is always as consistent as I can do.


    The Neopan Acros is only film that has these. TMX, TMY, Fomapan 200, Fomapan 100, ... Not a single problem.


    I have tried water stop and normal stop bath, no difference. Also refixing does not remove fog.
    The temperatures should be really close to 20°C. The biggest change in temperature happens when pre soak water is poured in. The film and tank is initially around 22°C and the pre soak water is 20°C.

  2. #2
    dpurdy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Portland OR USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,055
    Images
    38
    I have processed thousands of sheets of film over 35 years and that includes the last couple of years 4x5 Acros and I have never seen this problem before. Actually it looks like a platinum print made on an unevenly humidified piece of paper. My guess is this is a factory defect. I would expect Fuji to have very high standards and very tight quality control but stuff happens. I once got a bad batch of film from Ilford so it can happen to anyone. That is my vote, especially considering all the films and developers you have done and not seen the problem. I hope it goes away for you. You might open another box and try some out of it.
    Dennis

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,842
    Is this film old or out of date ?......

    Simon. ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  4. #4
    Usagi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Turku, Finland. Northern Europe.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    360
    Images
    18
    The film was outdated. Expiration 10/2011. It was last box of Quickload Acros that I had.
    I bought 'enough' quickloads from Tokyo at spring 2009 but as prices went higher and Quickloads disappeared, I kept last box in the freezer (around -28 degree celcius) until november.


    I have still around 10 undeveloped sheets. Now I am not sure should I develop them using some other developing style (if the modified Paterson Orbital is cause) or should I investigate this more and use my single sheet stocks for testing.
    I guess that Quickloads and normal boxed single sheets has same film base.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,842
    Quickloads have a different base support than normal sheet film.

    As the film is out of date and it seems to be exhibiting as issue I would just put it in the bin.

    FUJI coating and product quality is outstanding, in every way, my guess is that it has reacted with the packaging around it, but that is absolutely a guess.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN tcehnology Limited :

  6. #6
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,364
    Images
    225

    Fuji Acros (sheet) and blotches

    Simon would know more than me but my thought was freezer burn, that some moisture got into them, froze at the edges, then of course thawed out when you took it out but damaged the emulsion when the crystals formed. Are you careful to put then in a sealed container before freezing or do you leave them in the freezer in just the original packaging? Sometimes that's not enough. That's my best guess.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #7
    Usagi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Turku, Finland. Northern Europe.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    360
    Images
    18
    I use ziplock type plastic bags for storing film in the freezer. But I cannot say that there haven't been any moisture.


    Here's another example. Full frame and then crop.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 45_2012-12-13-3_blotches_web.jpg   45_2012-12-13-3_blotches_zoom_web.jpg  
    Last edited by Usagi; 02-14-2013 at 05:55 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added pictures

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    San Clemente, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,101
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley View Post
    Quickloads have a different base support than normal sheet film...
    I am reticent to question you Simon, but are you positive about that? Fuji Quickload Acros is adhered to its leader and trailer with some kind of adhesive, but the film base appears to be identical to standard (non-Quickload) Acros. Which is to say, the same 7-mil PET one finds most black and white sheet film coated on. Fuji's version, although I've measured it with digital calipers and found the thickness specification to be met, is more flexible than other manufacturers' film bases of the same material and dimensions.

    Out of curiosity, do you make that statement from special knowledge provided by Fuji or have you perhaps been mislead by the film's higher than typical flexibility?

    To the OP's question, a friend of mine stockpiled much pack film when Tri-X was discontinued in that format. Some time later, when removing it from his freezer, making exposures and developing it, he found the negatives unusable. It seems the paper used was not intended for extended storage and had attacked the film. I've no idea what the physical specifications of Fuji's black packet paper are, but wonder whether the film damage could have occurred because of extended contact with something that isn't safe for that situation.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,842
    Hi Sal,

    I know it was a different support 'when quick loads came out' as we looked to provide a product and you had to have a different support ( base ) , and you are always welcome to question me, you could be correct if they reverted to the standard base.

    Kind Regards

    Simon.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    San Clemente, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,101
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley View Post
    ...I know it was a different support 'when quick loads came out' as we looked to provide a product and you had to have a different support ( base )...you could be correct if they reverted to the standard base...
    Thanks for your reply. My understanding that the base of QuicklLad Acros doesn't differ from the base of loose-sheet Acros is a result of observing the physical characteristics of each version, with reference to the most recent production. I can find no difference in length, width, thickness, flexibility, surface texture/gloss of the base and emulsion sides or resistance to tearing.

    I have also been able to discern no difference between the base of READYLOAD and loose sheets of 100TMX; the same "adhered to a leader and trailer" approach was used for that product.

    This is of great interest to me. Since you considered offering packet film at one time and were dissuaded by the need for a different film base, if that requirement has since been eliminated, perhaps you might look into the possibility again. A Quickload- (or READYLOAD-) compatible box of 4x5 Delta 100 would be a fantasy come true. Maybe you could obtain Fuji's now-idle (and hopefully not scrapped) QuickLoad manufacturing equipment at a very reasonable price.

    Thanks again for being so responsive.
    Last edited by Sal Santamaura; 02-15-2013 at 11:29 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: To add comment about QuickLoad manufacturing equipment

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin