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  1. #11
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Kodak 35mm B&W film used to come in a foil wrapper. Color films came in a screw top metal can.

    I imagine one reason for the can was to protect the film when it was mailed in to Kodak for processing. B&W was usually done locally. Kodak didn't sell B&W processing mailers though they did have a B&W processing service that was used by retail stores.

    FWIW: Agfa used to package their 120 in screw top aluminum cans.
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  2. #12

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    35mm films have a 'tail' that sticks out of the cassette, since the packing lines are totally automatic you need to 'tub' the film or you would not be able to package automatically without fear of damaging the tail, or at least higher waste at that packaging stage, in addition, once tubbed the films are fully protected from damage and moisture and ingestion of potentially damaging gases etc, etc they also obviously form the strength in the boxed surround, and they stack on shelves...hence why they are boxed.

    As someone says...ahhh but you only foil the film in the 50 roll bulk packs of film you sell?

    Absolutely correct, we do, and because of that we have to use a different finishing route that has a manual element plus significant 'oversee' and actually costs significantly more to produce, but having 50 tubbed plastic films in one box would not be very eco-friendly and as we all know being eco friendly is not always cheap....but it is the correct thing to do.

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  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Felinik View Post
    There should be a recycle system for the plastic film canisters, I have a cpl of bags of them here just eating space...

    They are recyclable.

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    Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Arts: Journalism - University of Arkansas 2014

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  4. #14
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by ndrs View Post

    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    type 135 cassettes were packed in foil packs (further packed in those cardboard boxes) in the Soviet Union and the GDR.
    In fact those Soviet films were usually sold without cassettes, of right length and both ends properly cut but you had to load them into your own cassette.
    Yes, I know about those re-fills. Here is a photo of such refill:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lancephoto/6178375724/


    But to my understanding the 135 cassettes were packaged the same way.

    older:http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi.../Orwo-np22.jpg
    more recent:http://cloud.lomography.com/576/324/...2353816585.jpg





    here is a variety of type of boxes:
    http://idrh.smugmug.com/Photography/...0/L/Pots-L.jpg
    Last edited by AgX; 02-13-2013 at 12:43 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkroom317 View Post
    Of course they are, I meant a recycle program where you send them in and get a discount voucher on .00x cents per plastic canister the manufacturer gets back so they don't have to manufacture new ones...

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  6. #16
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Why do 35mm films come in nice plastic canister??
    Or... why don't 120 films come in a nice plastic canister? (Adox films do).


    Steve.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Yes, I know about those re-fills. Here is a photo of such refill:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lancephoto/6178375724/
    But to my understanding the 135 cassettes were packaged the same way.
    older:http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi.../Orwo-np22.jpg
    more recent:http://cloud.lomography.com/576/324/...2353816585.jpg
    You're right about ORWO packaging. Soviet films however came without cassettes by default. I can't recall seeing any of those films coming with a cassette, although I can't rule out they might have in exceptional cases. Most of the Soviet films were loaded into used ORWO or Foma cassettes. Foma's metal cassettes were especially popular because of their ruggedness. ORWO also had thin aluminium canisters with plastic caps for their transparency films like UT18, those were also re-used in SU.

  8. #18

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    Older films (like Efke / CHS 25, RIP) came on PET base, so there's a notice on their web site:

    "CHS 35mm and 120 Films are beeing coated on clear PET. Therefore the films are sensitive to light piping. We sell all 35mm and 120 films in black plastic containers. Please load your camera only in subdued light and put the films back in their black containers as soon as possible."

    I got FP4 and HP5 in a foil: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jernej_...in/photostream

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Felinik View Post
    There should be a recycle system for the plastic film canisters, I have a cpl of bags of them here just eating space...

    I once traded 20-25 empty canisters for around 10 rolls of unexposed film.. He was very happy with that deal since he didn't shoot film anymore but had a million uses for the canisters. Wish it could be that simple more often!

    On topic: I guess that the canister encourages people to be a little more cautious with their finished roll as well and just not stick it in their sand/dust-filled jeans pocket.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by cl3mens View Post
    He was very happy with that deal since he didn't shoot film anymore but had a million uses for the canisters.
    Unfortunately, every time he went to use them:

    a) he felt the need for a snack; and
    b) he couldn't remember what he intended to do with them.
    Matt

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