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  1. #1

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    Why do 35mm films come in nice plastic canister??

    This is more of a curiosity question....

    You know the nice plastic canister that virtually all 35mm films today come in? I understand, in the past, these used to be metal. To me, it looks like 35mm films are the type needing LEAST protection of this level. It already comes in a sturdy canister. A simple foil pack like 120 film should suffice to keep the film fresh. (may even be better because foil packages are hermetically sealed...)

    Anyone know technical or historical reason behind this?
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #2

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    I would suggest cost first of all, the plastic may come from recycled plastic and therefore very cheap plus they are watertight.

  3. #3
    AgX
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    I guess once Ilford packed their films in Wedgwood ceramics...


    To be serious:

    type 135 cassettes were packed in foil packs (further packed in those cardboard boxes) in the Soviet Union and the GDR.


    Once there were Kodak boxes made out aluminium with plastic lid.
    Last edited by AgX; 02-13-2013 at 11:22 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4

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    Great question. I wonder if the Kodak customer service reps could find the answer.

  5. #5
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    They help when you refrigerate or freeze film. 120 film comes in an air tight wrapper. 35mm does not. If the plastic canister was not there, I fear condensation would be a bit of a problem when the film is defrosted again.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

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    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #6

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    The metal pots had a screw top lid and (if I remember correctly?) a soft seal - so they were in fact air and water tight. The plastic ones are neither, but still pretty dust-resistant. Getting a few grains of dust or sand stuck in the felt light-trap is unlikely to be good news, so some sort of protection is a good idea.

    Multipacks of Ilford 135 film are/were indeed plastic-wrapped like the 120 rolls. Probably the most robust combination is those 120 rolls which are in the heat-sealed plastic and then put inside a big plastic pot, as that gives both gas and dust protection. EDIT: - I just checked my stash, and I have mis-remembered this as the rolls sold in the pots are not inside the plastic stuff after all, oops!

  7. #7

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    There should be a recycle system for the plastic film canisters, I have a cpl of bags of them here just eating space...

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  8. #8
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    I'm guessing the plastic canister is intended to protect the 35mm film cassette itself from incidental deformation, as it is unlikely to fit in a camera and/or be usable if it is bent. 120 needs no such protection.
    Fred Latchaw
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    Whatever that's supposed to mean.

  9. #9
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Felinik View Post
    There should be a recycle system for the plastic film canisters, I have a cpl of bags of them here just eating space...

    Here in Germany there is: they are collected in the specified non-paper packaging recycling.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    type 135 cassettes were packed in foil packs (further packed in those cardboard boxes) in the Soviet Union and the GDR.
    In fact those Soviet films were usually sold without cassettes, of right length and both ends properly cut but you had to load them into your own cassette.

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