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  1. #21
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I haven't got experience working in the dark, my bulk loading has all "to-date" been done in daylight. So this is something I'm thinking of doing "next time"...

    One thing about coming to the end of a roll and "knowing" it's not going to come out... Like the first few frames of a roll, you "know" they aren't going to come out either...

    If you come to the end of a roll while shooting, it's easy enough to change rolls and take a couple shots of what you were shooting at that moment.

    So maybe it's not really a big deal.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    If you come to the end of a roll while shooting, it's easy enough to change rolls and take a couple shots of what you were shooting at that moment.

    So maybe it's not really a big deal.
    This is how I do it too, I always load my rolls with 40 frames, and when I reach 35, I tend to use 36 and 37 for "non critical shots", and if there's still anything left after that I shoot right out in the sky etc.

    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  3. #23
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Felinik View Post
    I've been thinking about starting to do this as well, do you use a bulk loader in the darkness or you do it manually?

    Techniques, Advice ?
    I use a bulk loader. Be careful and tape the film to the spool accurately. Once the film is secured in the cartridge and the bulk loader closed, lights could be turned on. However, there's no need for lights just to wind the film into the cartridge. Usually I respool 100 feet of film in one boring session.

  4. #24
    mhcfires's Avatar
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    I don't use a bulk loader. I use the Leica cassettes, loading in the dark. I stretch out the length between my outstretched arms, trim the end to insert into the cassette, wind it by hand and pop it into the cassette. It doesn't take long, I have about fifteen cassettes, takes about twenty minutes to load them all up. I can trim the leaders in the light.
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  5. #25

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    I use 3 for leader, x for required number of frames, and 3 for the exposed tail which becomes the leader in the camera.

    If you can figure how to tape the film to the spool in the dark, close it up, then turn on the lights, you will get a few more frames.

    I have since gone to a bench winder where the film goes off the big roll to a spool in the dark. Not for the inexperienced.

  6. #26
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    Rolling your own : one caveat

    Quick question: I have a Lloyd's bulk loader that is like new, except that I managed to break the little round plastic piece, with the hole in it, that resides inside the loading flap. I *think* the flap will still be light-tight. Will it?

  7. #27
    mrred's Avatar
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    If this is the guide where the crank fits, then yes. I have had one broken for years. You will easily find out soon enough.
    Get it right in the camera, the first time... My flickr
    Peter Carter

  8. #28
    Terry Christian's Avatar
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    Rolling your own : one caveat

    Thanks, mrred, that's exactly what I meant. I kinda figured that piece is so easy to break that it couldn't possibly be THAT necessary to not break, or else we'd be swamped with useless Lloyd loaders.

  9. #29

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    Rolling your own : one caveat

    That piece just keeps the door shut while loading. If it's broken you should just hold the door closed with one hand while winding with the other...but it doesn't otherwise perform any light blocking duties.

    Duncan

  10. #30
    AOCo's Avatar
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    This is funny because on mine, it is bent (I wonder how molded plastic can bend this way, I'm therefore assuming this is by design), and hence is prone to break at some point. Very weird, because it makes the closing of the door a bit harder. Maybe that holds things better into place.

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