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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Anyway the OP said he doesn't want grain... So my suggestion...

    Assuming you are shooting 120, HP5+ will be fine grained enough for you.

    If shooing 35mm, either HP5+ or Delta400.

    Tmax personally I find very fine but "boring" looking.
    I certainly agree with your comment on the TMax films. They are also rather fussy to develop.

    I think the OP said that grain was not important. Which is good because HP5+ is grainy. While FP4+ is good I don't like the look of HP5+.

    Kodak reformulated Tri-X a few years ago and it is finer grained now. It has a certain look that other fast films do not have. It is certainly a favorite with professionals.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 02-19-2013 at 04:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I would recommend OP decide on some basic characteristics first, narrow the list down and try one or two films. Trying them all is pointless unless you're going to spend a year shooting many, many rolls of each and refining each one.

    Yes, Tri-X is a wonderful film. So is TMY-2. But OP doesn't want to use Kodak. End of story. He's left with HP5+, Delta 400 and Fuji. Delta is a tabular grained film which will look different than HP5+. So maybe a good try would be HP5+ and Delta 400. Start with those two. They are both superb films as Ian Grant noted above. If Rodinal is your developer, use Rodinal.
    I think this quote about covers it. There are a few other alternatives (all I can think of are the ones mentioned by the OP: Kentmere, Foma, Rollei), but the Ilford offerings seem like the natural place to start. I kind of like Fomapan 400, but it seems like Rodinal would emphasize all its weakest characteristics, especially in 35mm.

    To my eye, HP5+ and TX are more similar than different in normal usage. I mean, obviously there *are* differences---they behave very differently in Diafine, for instance---but at box speed, normal lighting and contrast, no special effects, those differences aren't that big (certainly as compared to T-grain vs. conventional-grain films, e.g.). I don't think TX is automatically a reason to reconsider the OP's desire not to use Kodak.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  3. #13
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    What Michael R says, good advice. HP5 with Rodinal will give a fair bit of grain, Delta much less...test it to see what you like. I use Tri-X in Pyrocat which gives fine grain, I'm sure that HP5 in Pyrocat will deliver similar results.

  4. #14

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    I've never done Neopan 400 in rodianl, but many folks on the net say it's great. The OP says it would be nice to have both 35 & 120 formats available, but Neopan is NLA in 120.

  5. #15
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tony lockerbie View Post
    What Michael R says, good advice. HP5 with Rodinal will give a fair bit of grain, Delta much less...test it to see what you like. I use Tri-X in Pyrocat which gives fine grain, I'm sure that HP5 in Pyrocat will deliver similar results.
    I've been very surprised by the fine grain I'm getting with HP5 in Pyrocat it's a superb combination, I've made quite a few large exhibition prints.

    For 20 years I was using Rodinal for everything except the odd fast films but Pyrocat is like Rodinal on steroids with even finer grain.


    Ian

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    I certainly agree with your comment on the TMax films. They are also rather fussy to develop.

    I think the OP said that grain was not important. Which is good because HP5+ is grainy. While FP4+ is good I don't like the look of HP5+.

    Kodak reformulated Tri-X a feww years ago and it is finer grained now. It has a certain look that other fast films do not have. It is certainly a favorite with professionals.
    Hmmm... I'm usually in agreement with you, Gerald. But I'm rather surprised to see someone with your knowledge and experience jump in on the "TMax films are boring" business. They are different, but boring? How, specifically is TMax boring? I also dispute the notion they are fussy to develop. They are a little more sensitive, but not much, and contrary to what has become the conventional wisdom regarding TMax, they are not prone to hot highlights or anything like that.

    As for Tri-X, it is certainly an excellent film. But I'd wager many of the people who use it think they are using "Tri-X", not the latest version of a film that has undergone several changes since their heroes used it. There is also the difference between Tri-X 400 and 320 (which is not available in 35mm). So, what specifically makes Tri-X 400 the finest 400 speed film?

  7. #17

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    tmax films are weird ...
    i shot a boatload of 100 and 400
    when i did newspaper work. 100 blocked up like mad with flash
    400 was sweet.
    they aren't fussy, i just don't like the uv layer in the 400 speed, it takes forever to contact print.
    they both look beautifully grainy when souped to max density in coffee.

    if xxx isn't an option, i'd go for neopan its very nice

    YMMV

  8. #18
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    HP5+ at EI 800 in normal lighting, Rodinal 1+50 = great. HP5+ has a tendency to look a little flatter than most other films, not sure why. By giving it less exposure and developing longer, it really comes alive.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #19
    nicholai's Avatar
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    I dont understand the Kodak hate, i'd use Tri-X. If you're stubborn, use HP5+, its good, yes, but i still love tri-x.
    Nicholai Nissen
    Kolding, Denmark
    nicholainissen@gmail.com

  10. #20

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    Perhaps "boring" doesn't describe my feeling, but I just don't like the TMax films. Don't like their look, and they exhaust fixer more rapidly than other films among other things. I don't mind grain and prefer older film formulations.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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