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  1. #21

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    My "goto film" is Fomapan 400 @EI 320 but instead of R09 I use the Fomadon LQN with great results.
    Last edited by Felinik; 02-19-2013 at 04:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  2. #22
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Suggest a 400 film

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Well, there's a lot more to a film than granularity/graininess. OP specifically said he's ok with grain (obviously if he's using Rodinal).

    I would recommend OP decide on some basic characteristics first, narrow the list down and try one or two films. Trying them all is pointless unless you're going to spend a year shooting many, many rolls of each and refining each one.

    Yes, Tri-X is a wonderful film. So is TMY-2. But OP doesn't want to use Kodak. End of story. He's left with HP5+, Delta 400 and Fuji. Delta is a tabular grained film which will look different than HP5+. So maybe a good try would be HP5+ and Delta 400. Start with those two. They are both superb films as Ian Grant noted above. If Rodinal is your developer, use Rodinal.
    Yea I somehow misread the grain comment, so now my answer is HP5+ all the way.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #23
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    Suggest a 400 film

    Quote Originally Posted by nicholai View Post
    I dont understand the Kodak hate, i'd use Tri-X. If you're stubborn, use HP5+, its good, yes, but i still love tri-x.
    The hate isn't hate, it's reality, Kodak will soon be gone. Someone will probably buy the Tri-x formulation, but knowing the age and size of the machines that coat the film, it might not make financial sense to re-design smaller machines and the larger machines are too big for demand.

    So it's a high likelihood it won't be around long, so why learn a films characteristics and then have to start over when it goes away, I think that's the OP's thought process.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  4. #24
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    Suggest a 400 film

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    Hmmm... I'm usually in agreement with you, Gerald. But I'm rather surprised to see someone with your knowledge and experience jump in on the "TMax films are boring" business. They are different, but boring? How, specifically is TMax boring? I also dispute the notion they are fussy to develop. They are a little more sensitive, but not much, and contrary to what has become the conventional wisdom regarding TMax, they are not prone to hot highlights or anything like that.

    As for Tri-X, it is certainly an excellent film. But I'd wager many of the people who use it think they are using "Tri-X", not the latest version of a film that has undergone several changes since their heroes used it. There is also the difference between Tri-X 400 and 320 (which is not available in 35mm). So, what specifically makes Tri-X 400 the finest 400 speed film?
    I find Tmax doesn't have a shine that I like, the highlights are diminished and the the fine grain is there but the details aren't defined, I've ONLY souped it in DD-X but the point of buying it is for the grain characteristics and the bland look just doesn't wow me. I'm going to try over exposing it and see if that changes. But I just wasn't impressed.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #25
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Start out with Tri-X, its what everyone starts out on. If you shoot film, and you have not shot a fair amount of Tri-x it is very odd. Practically everything is compared to tri-x in d76, its like a baseline for testing almost. Anyway its a classic and should at least be experienced before it is one day gone.

    I also like tmax 400 as well, its very nice to use and enlarge. And I cannot disagree with the recommendations for HP5+ it is a very good performer as well. Every once in a while Ilford does promotion packs where you get 2for1 or buy 2 get 1 package deals of HP5+, that is a nice opportunity to buy it in bulk.

    If you are in the US, try the arista premium from freestyle, it is tri-x, or atleast the last of it that Kodak is selling to them to repackage.

  6. #26
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Suggest a 400 film

    I have one further suggestion, it may sound crazy, try ilford Delta 3200 and shoot at 1000 or 800 and soup in DD-X. Just give it a shot.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  7. #27
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I find Tmax doesn't have a shine that I like, the highlights are diminished and the the fine grain is there but the details aren't defined, I've ONLY souped it in DD-X but the point of buying it is for the grain characteristics and the bland look just doesn't wow me. I'm going to try over exposing it and see if that changes. But I just wasn't impressed.
    Do you print in a darkroom or scan?
    TMax 400 has better resolution (or detail) than FP4+. It has one of the longest straight line curves of any film, will react very well to agitation changes you make to shape that curve into a shoulder if you like that better. When you take this film to the darkroom and print it, or if you use it with a scanner that can actually resolve grain (like an Imacon Flextight), you will know what the full potential of TMax 400 is. Until then you're just seeing an approximation.

    I attached three images that are scans of prints. If you can tell me whether they are TMax 400 or not I'll be very impressed.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Give of Fleece.jpg   Mr Moxom.jpg   Teacher.jpg  
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #28
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Suggest a 400 film

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Do you print in a darkroom or scan?
    TMax 400 has better resolution (or detail) than FP4+. It has one of the longest straight line curves of any film, will react very well to agitation changes you make to shape that curve into a shoulder if you like that better. When you take this film to the darkroom and print it, or if you use it with a scanner that can actually resolve grain (like an Imacon Flextight), you will know what the full potential of TMax 400 is. Until then you're just seeing an approximation.

    I attached three images that are scans of prints. If you can tell me whether they are TMax 400 or not I'll be very impressed.
    I scan, I don't have any room for an enlarger and printing.

    Resolution doesn't do anything for me when the image looks bland.

    I would guess based on my limited experience, the first two are Tmax and the last one is something else (the large girl) of all of them the large girl image is the only one that's semi-interesting but even that doesn't "do it" for me (not commenting on photographic skill, just it's characteristics).

    So am I wrong?


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #29
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I scan, I don't have any room for an enlarger and printing.

    Resolution doesn't do anything for me when the image looks bland.

    I would guess based on my limited experience, the first two are Tmax and the last one is something else (the large girl) of all of them the large girl image is the only one that's semi-interesting but even that doesn't "do it" for me (not commenting on photographic skill, just it's characteristics).
    The sheep is cropped to square 35mm 'old' TMax (TMY, not TMY-2) and pushed to 1600, the portrait of Andrew is Tri-X 400 120, and the woman is TMax 400 TMY-2 in 120. All developed in replenished Xtol and printed on Ilford paper.

    The whole 'TMax is flat' thing I could never understand. It is exactly what you make it.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #30
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Suggest a 400 film

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    The sheep is cropped to square 35mm 'old' TMax (TMY, not TMY-2) and pushed to 1600, the portrait of Andrew is Tri-X 400 120, and the woman is TMax 400 TMY-2 in 120. All developed in replenished Xtol and printed on Ilford paper.

    The whole 'TMax is flat' thing I could never understand. It is exactly what you make it.
    Well I guess if I'm not the only one then I'm not entirely wrong, but all those images are flat.

    I'll try shooting 400 as 320 maybe that will help.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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