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  1. #11

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    Basically, the orange color is from the color couplers and is used for color masking color correction. See Bunny Hanson's 1950 article Color Correction with Colored Couplers at http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josa/a...=josa-40-3-166[/B]

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    A clear base just allows for faster printing times. Tmax 100 in 120 is practically clear. Colored bases such as with color neg films will act like a safe light. And staining developers will also give a bit of this safe light effect to some areas such as sky's. Also i you are printing on vs or graded would also make a difference. I think Barry's diaxtol is a type of staining developer. I'll have to check in his book the edge of darkness.
    Gosh, the typos haha:

    Also if you are printing on vc or graded would also make a difference.

    To elaborate, graded would be more of the safe light effect, VC papers will decrease contrast and act as if you were printing at a lower grade.

  3. #13

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    Please excuse me the quality of the attached pictures, but I hope it is clear now what I mean.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    TMY-2 is on the left, Delta 400 is on the right. As you can see, the Delta's base
    is much more "milky" than the other one.

    The density of the base is more or less the same:

    Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #14

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    Yes, different densities, different colours, it doesn't matter, that has no bearing on resolution or degrading the resolution of the film. The 'resolution' information is contained in the emulsion layer, not the film base. The film base can only affect contrast or exposure time under the enlarger, and even then not by much.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    Yes, different densities, different colours, it doesn't matter, that has no bearing on resolution or degrading the resolution of the film. The 'resolution' information is contained in the emulsion layer, not the film base. The film base can only affect contrast or exposure time under the enlarger, and even then not by much.

    Steve
    That sure seems hard to believe, but who am I to say. It would seem that a film with a real dense base would have something to do with reduced resolution. Of course I have seen no film with a base this dense either. JohnW

  6. #16

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    Unless some one can produce examples of PRINTS (not scans which create various false artifacts) of each film that show a difference in resolution then people are overthinking a nonexistant problem.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Unless some one can produce examples of PRINTS (not scans which create various false artifacts) of each film that show a difference in resolution then people are overthinking a nonexistant problem.
    Not me Gerald! I follow the old line, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". I have never seen a problem, but must admit that I like to see as clear a base as possible whether it makes a difference or not. I guess it's like water. If you have two glasses of water, one murky-muddy looking and the other crystal clear, which are you more likely to drink ? Now, most of us are going to be willing to drink the crystal clear glass and not the murky one. Of course what we don't see is all those little animals in the clear glass that are out to do us harm while the murky glass has been purged of those gritters. Looks can be deceiving? JohnW

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