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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Texas
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    How about a 2 stop ND filter in front of the lens for daytime!
    Regards,

    Michael
    Dallas, TX


    Pentax 6x7
    Mamiya 7 ii
    Mamiya C330
    4x5 and 8x10 large format

    And for those non film moments a Fuji X-Pro 1 and Nikon D4 and D800E.

  2. #12

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    Or, you can do what I do, use a G(15) filter which will darken blue skies nicely and will basically convert your 400 speed film to 125.
    -Fred

  3. #13

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    Dec 2006
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    Like desertratt, I worked for years where the company bought Tri-X so you shot Tri-X regardless of the conditons. ND filters might help you stay within shutter speed limits on a bright sunny day BUT in the end, its really about contrast control.
    You think 400 is too fast for outdoors/daylight because the contrast gets out of control with blown highlights and empty shadows. Its too slow indoors in the dark because there is simply not enough contrast.
    Pushing to 1600 in the dark is really raising the contrast by using a more active developer. I used a LOT of Acufine in those days, a co-worker used Edwal FG7 with added sulfite and we both got usable pics out of 400 speed Tri-X with the camera meters set to 1600.
    Pulling back to 200 or so needs a less active developer to hold the highlights back from over development. That's harder to figure out but D76 diluted 1 to 1 at the time recommended for straight D76 is a good place to start.
    Bottom line - if you have one film, you need multiple developers to cover all situations.
    Takes lots of experimentation to find what you like.

  4. #14

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    Nov 2012
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    Just started out in B&W, so just started looking into filters
    I carry around a camera with me all the time (these days, it's a Nikon F2)
    From the digital world, I worried about diffraction closing my lens all the way down, hence F8-F11 out of habit.
    Harry Lime, what do you mean TMAX 400 v2. is more linear than Tri X? (longer toe or shorter toe?) (sorry, B&W terminology is still a bit new to me)
    Thanks!

  5. #15

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    Sep 2007
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    Richmond VA.
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    I'm just the opposite, I have to use a tripod. I have nerve damage in my feet and hands.

    Jeff

  6. #16
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    Dec 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarageBoy View Post
    Harry Lime, what do you mean TMAX 400 v2. is more linear than Tri X? (longer toe or shorter toe?) (sorry, B&W terminology is still a bit new to me)
    Thanks!
    Yes, Tri-X has a dip in the toe and there is a roll off in the shoulder.
    Tmax is pretty linear.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4043/f4043.pdf

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...4017/f4017.pdf

  7. #17

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    Jul 2010
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    If shadow detail is not important (and it usually is not for night scenes) then it is easy to push 400TX by 2 or 3 stops. Using a solvent developer like Perceptol will lower the film speed by about a stop. So 400TX can have an EI range from 200 to 3200.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  8. #18
    nicholai's Avatar
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    Jul 2012
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    Kolding, Denmark
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    I find ISO400 to be the most flexible of all. I use Tri-X to almost anything now.
    Nicholai Nissen
    Kolding, Denmark
    nicholainissen@gmail.com

  9. #19
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
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    Southern California
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    I use 400 speed film at box speed for black & white and color because it covers almost all my needs. If I need more speed, I choose a tripod first, strobe second, and flashbulbs third.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Mission Viejo, California
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    Camera bodies are so cheap these days one can keep a daytime camera and a nighttime camera loaded with the appropriate films.
    - Bill Lynch

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