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  1. #1
    Dean Taylor's Avatar
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    4x5 processing method: practical?

    hello--



    A photographer has posted a YT video explaining a method of 4x5 processing.

    In it, he takes the exposed 4x5 film and curls it, longways--emulsion in, of course--and secures it with a type of rubber band. The ends of the curl do not touch, allowing chemical bath to reach the emulsion. He may then place 4 of these...'curls' into a Paterson System 4 tank for agitation.



    My admittedly inexperienced analysis wants to conclude that for 4x5 film, it is, indeed, superior to tray processing--avoiding scratches, splashes and spills, etc. But what do you pros think? Is it, in fact, a trade off (something lost/something gained)?



    Thank you!

    Dean

  2. #2

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    I've not used this method, but to help with your research, search for "taco method." That's how people refer to what you're describing.
    --
    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

  3. #3

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    It seems to work well for some people.
    I tried it a couple of times and got very uneven development; for the tiny amount of 4x5 I do, I get better results from tray processing.

  4. #4
    cjbecker's Avatar
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    I have used the taco method with great success. But I went have to tray processing.

  5. #5

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    Is this the video where he uses fabric covered hair bands so water can soak through and remove the anti halation coating?

    I think its a nice idea but I'm not convinced that you would get guaranteed even development. I'm a bit paranoid about even development at the moment having dumped my MOD54 insert because it was causing banding on the negs. I am now starting with a Paterson Orbital tray, which seems to me the best daylight tank solution for 4x5 although 4 negs a one time is limiting sometimes. But I think if I weren't so fed up with a series of ruined negs I would probably try the rubber band method, but for now I want the safest method possible.

    Steve

  6. #6
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Taylor View Post
    hello--



    A photographer has posted a YT video explaining a method of 4x5 processing.

    In it, he takes the exposed 4x5 film and curls it, longways--emulsion in, of course--and secures it with a type of rubber band. The ends of the curl do not touch, allowing chemical bath to reach the emulsion. He may then place 4 of these...'curls' into a Paterson System 4 tank for agitation.



    My admittedly inexperienced analysis wants to conclude that for 4x5 film, it is, indeed, superior to tray processing--avoiding scratches, splashes and spills, etc. But what do you pros think? Is it, in fact, a trade off (something lost/something gained)?



    Thank you!

    Dean
    This sounds like an excellent idea. I would use it and thanks for the post. It also makes me wonder if you could do the same but curl it sideways to get 4 in a double tank?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #7
    ParkerSmithPhoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean Taylor View Post
    My admittedly inexperienced analysis wants to conclude that for 4x5 film, it is, indeed, superior to tray processing--avoiding scratches, splashes and spills, etc. But what do you pros think? Is it, in fact, a trade off (something lost/something gained)?
    I've never done taco method, but the Unicolor Drum method and the BTZS tubes are both stupid easy.
    Parker Smith Photography, Inc.
    Atlanta, GA

    Commercial & Fine Art Photography
    Portrait Photography

  8. #8
    kintatsu's Avatar
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    My experiments with this led to uneven development. They antihalation dye didn't rinse out where the elastic was, even with the fabric ones. I also had a couple bands come loose and damage 2 sheets. With my tray development, I get even development and nice control of the values.

  9. #9
    Dean Taylor's Avatar
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    a Visqueen darkroom...

    thank you, APUG community, for sharing your expertise! Much to consider here, food for thought...

    At any rate--and, while I am assimilating this, I came up with another idea (however--and, as there is nothing new under the sun--chances are that the 'theory' has been applied by someone else.). And, that is: a 'darkroom' in the apartment.

    Several photographers (here and at photo.net and Large Format) wrote of tray processing for 4x5. It occurred to me that using a change bag arrangement to load the Riteways is quite...constricting, to say the least. Also, to utilize trays would necessitate a bona fide darkroom--I am fairly certain that getting my apartment pitch black would be difficult at best, what with the site lighting on all night at the property, etc.

    I thought it might be appropriate to buy a camper's tent and put every thing inside--a small table, trays, Riteways, 4x5 film, chemicals, etc.--and, then cover it with a darker material. But, (and, following Ockham), why not, I mused, then delete the camper's tent and just purchase a roll of Visqueen*, cut off a 12x12 foot piece and hang it from a swag hook on the ceiling ('pinch off' a handful at the center and hang).

    I know for a fact that it would enable a pitch-black environment within (without hassling with window covering, etc.), with plenty of room to work inside--whether loading Riteways, tray processing, etc.

    Has anyone tried this--it's inexpensive, collapsible (I can fold it and stow it away in a kitchen drawer), lightproof, as roomy as I need it to be.

    Best,

    Dean

    *Visqueen: heavy black plastic used at construction sites for covering material, etc


    (addendum: apartments here designed with meager bathroom space)
    Last edited by Dean Taylor; 02-28-2013 at 10:53 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10

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    Or, if you have a bathroom or other room without a window, hang a blanket over the door. That's what I do.
    --
    Kenton Brede
    http://kentonbrede.com/

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