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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by h.v. View Post
    <snip>

    I really don't want to have to give up the Hexar, it's been a dream to use on the streets. So much easier than my Nikon's or my Yashica. So this cleaning - would it be easy to do myself?
    Unless you are really handy or very brave, I wouldn't recommend a DIY CLA. Here in Pennsylvania they run about $150. If you're going to keep the camera, its a good investment. There are so many small gears, electronics,etc that is crammed into a small space, it's not something that would be easy to do.

  2. #32

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    hi h.v.

    i wish i had such good advice when i started out ..
    one thing you might consider doing is getting a 100 foot long roll of film
    and roll your own film cassettes. you won't save much $$ BUT you will be able
    to shoot shorter rolls of film, maybe 12 exposures, like real estate agents used to shoot
    and get the bugs out of the system. PLUS you will have more experience by the end of it all
    spooling your film, and processing rolls

    older cameras always need to be cla'd you and your camera will be much happier once you get it back to tip top shape.
    i hate to suggest this, but one thing you might consider is a totally manual camera like a k1000 ( or similar )
    so you can set the asa, set the shutter speed and set the focus yourself without worrying that the
    camera's computer is on the blink. i got mine in 1981 and to be honest i would rather use it than
    the more fancy 35mm cameras i have, its solid and dependable ...

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    Don't give up! You've only been doing this for a month, and only processed 9 rolls. 99% of us made the same mistakes starting out (and the other 1% are liars). You've been learning (I bet you never put wet negs in sleeves again), and getting some satisfactory results. It will get easier. Your results will get more consistent. And, when it does, your sense of accomplishment will be that much stronger. Nothing worthwhile should be too easy...
    +1

    Like any other craft, doing it well takes some practice and experience. Assuming you can rule out equipment problems/failures, keep going and don't give up so fast. It can take some time. Who ever said making great negatives and prints is supposed to be the easiest thing anyway?

  4. #34
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck94022 View Post
    But unless you moonlight as a watchmaker, you probably don't want to tackle doing it yourself.
    One of my favorite aphorisms: "There are two kinds of people who would disassemble an antique pocket watch; watchmakers and fools."
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  5. #35
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Wait, you've been doing this for a month?

    When I'd done self development for a month, I was still at "I develop at home and shoot black and white film" (I didn't have a real relation to what film-brands I was shooting at that stage yet even.)
    Small steps makes for small mistakes, keep it as simple as possible, with as few variables as possible, then it's easier to identify and correct any mistakes.

    I've made many (and still make them).
    My start was like this: I was to develop my first black and white film, TMax developer mixed and ready in my accordian-bottle.
    Then I ruined it before actual the processing, because I turned on the lights before I got it into the tank.
    - I wanted to see what the heck the problem was, because I could not enter the bloddy film on the reel in the dark. :P

    I still developed the film though, just to go trough the process and debug my reel-loading procedure.

    Maybe you are expecting too much, too fast? It does indeed take time and effort over a longer period to get to know the process better, be patient and don't kill yourself over every mistake, learn and move on.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  6. #36

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    You don't find anything wrong with my negs? How so? There are a bunch that look almost black, with light bleeds. I almost always meter on the important part of the frame, the other times I don't by accident.
    The only two negatives that seem very dark are #19 and #20 in trhe lower right hand corner. Medium and fast speed films have a latitude of from 3 stops over exposed to 1 shop underexposed. Within this range you should be able to get good prints.

    What concerns me more is that the overexposure seems erratic not appearing in every frame. This would suggest a problem the camera. I would first try to borrow a light meter and a 18% gray card. With the camera set to manual exposure take a few exposures metering carefully on the gray card. Then on the same roll with the camera set on auto take a second set. Use the same scenes and setup for both sets of exposures. If the two sets of negatives are very different then there is something wrong with the camera.

    Another simpler test would be to use the "sunny 16 rule." Since the Hexar only goes up to 1/250 sec use a film with an ISO of 100 to 125. Again using manual mode, set the aperture at f/16 and the speed to 1/125 sec. Then take several pictures of sunnily lit scenes. Develop the film according to your developers instructions. The negatives should be exposed properly.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 03-01-2013 at 10:35 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #37
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    It may well be true what you're saying about setting the lens to maximum aperture, but that runs counter to normal practice for every other camera I've ever seen that has an auto-exposure feature. Normally, you set the lens to minimum aperture, and the camera will adjust to whatever it needs. If you have the lens set at something other than minimum, it will not stop down past the aperture you've set, and so it can run out of faster shutter speeds to compensate and yield an overexposed negative. IF this is the case, leaving the lens set at f2 would certainly explain the overexposed film, as would the 1/250th maximum shutter speed. Using Sunny 16 as a guide rule, if you're shooting 400 speed film, in full daylight you should be getting f16 @ 1/400th second as proper exposure. This is already beyond the capability of your camera. So first, I would try switching to ISO 100 film, and see if that alleviates your random overexposures. Second, I'd re-read the instruction manual (or find one if you don't have one- there's a great source for them online http://www.butkus.org/chinon/ ) and verify the program exposure mode works the way you've described. Try shooting a roll with the lens set to minimum aperture, not maximum, and see what that does.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    +1

    Like any other craft, doing it well takes some practice and experience. Assuming you can rule out equipment problems/failures, keep going and don't give up so fast. It can take some time. Who ever said making great negatives and prints is supposed to be the easiest thing anyway?
    Very true. An old friend of mine who was an experienced semi-pro photographer told me that, for high quality work, he was only satisfied with about one-in-ten of the negs he took.

    It's not an easy craft, but just occasionally you get a picture that says "WOW", then it's all worthwhile.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    hi h.v.

    i wish i had such good advice when i started out ..
    one thing you might consider doing is getting a 100 foot long roll of film
    and roll your own film cassettes. you won't save much $$ BUT you will be able
    to shoot shorter rolls of film, maybe 12 exposures, like real estate agents used to shoot
    and get the bugs out of the system. PLUS you will have more experience by the end of it all
    spooling your film, and processing rolls

    older cameras always need to be cla'd you and your camera will be much happier once you get it back to tip top shape.
    i hate to suggest this, but one thing you might consider is a totally manual camera like a k1000 ( or similar )
    so you can set the asa, set the shutter speed and set the focus yourself without worrying that the
    camera's computer is on the blink. i got mine in 1981 and to be honest i would rather use it than
    the more fancy 35mm cameras i have, its solid and dependable ...
    Heh, a K1000 isn't the best thing for street photography . I've been trying to move on and try different cameras from SLRs (which i've gotten bored of and don't find very good for street photography). I'm also more comfortable with AF, right now, for my main camera. I wouldnt mind a manual SLR sometime soon though, but I'd probably go for Nikon or Konica .

    The thing is that the Hexar isn't even that old. It would've been made between 1997 and the early 00s (it's the silver model). I know old cameras need repairs, but I wouldn't consider this camera that old. I just wouldn't have expected it. On the other hand, my Yashica, which I don't think got a CLA or anything before I bought it, works fine. My 1992 F90 works fine too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    The only two negatives that seem very dark are #19 and #20 in trhe lower right hand corner. Medium and fast speed films have a latitude of from 3 stops over exposed to 1 shop underexposed. Within this range you should be able to get good prints.

    What concerns me more is that the overexposure seems erratic not appearing in every frame. This would suggest a problem the camera. I would first try to borrow a light meter and a 18% gray card. With the camera set to manual exposure take a few exposures metering carefully on the gray card. Then on the same roll with the camera set on auto take a second set. Use the same scenes and setup for both sets of exposures. If the two sets of negatives are very different then there is something wrong with the camera.

    Another simpler test would be to use the "sunny 16 rule." Since the Hexar only goes up to 1/250 sec use a film with an ISO of 100 to 125. Again using manual mode, set the aperture at f/16 and the speed to 1/125 sec. Then take several pictures of sunnily lit scenes. Develop the film according to your developers instructions. The negatives should be exposed properly.
    In theory on most other cameras, this would be great. But manual exposure is very unorthodox and painful to use on the Hexar. It wasn't built for it. It was built for it's Programmed mode (which acts more like Aperture priority) and it does a really good job with that.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    It may well be true what you're saying about setting the lens to maximum aperture, but that runs counter to normal practice for every other camera I've ever seen that has an auto-exposure feature. Normally, you set the lens to minimum aperture, and the camera will adjust to whatever it needs. If you have the lens set at something other than minimum, it will not stop down past the aperture you've set, and so it can run out of faster shutter speeds to compensate and yield an overexposed negative. IF this is the case, leaving the lens set at f2 would certainly explain the overexposed film, as would the 1/250th maximum shutter speed. Using Sunny 16 as a guide rule, if you're shooting 400 speed film, in full daylight you should be getting f16 @ 1/400th second as proper exposure. This is already beyond the capability of your camera. So first, I would try switching to ISO 100 film, and see if that alleviates your random overexposures. Second, I'd re-read the instruction manual (or find one if you don't have one- there's a great source for them online http://www.butkus.org/chinon/ ) and verify the program exposure mode works the way you've described. Try shooting a roll with the lens set to minimum aperture, not maximum, and see what that does.
    Yeah, I know it runs counter to most cameras, but that is how the Konica Hexar works. I've seen it with my own two eyes and have read about it. In extremely bright sunlight, it's probably going to be at f/22 and 1/250th with 400 ISO film, even though the aperture dial is set to f/2. Basically, leaving it at f/2 ensures that I get the highest shutter speed available, because there isn't really a shutter priority mode. I can try the thing at the end. So many different things to try out, thanks guys.
    cities & citizens - edmonton street photography (mostly), 100% film

  10. #40

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    Camera is over exposing. There is no way part of roll can be correct, and part not from processing in a film tank.

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