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  1. #11
    Jim Taylor's Avatar
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    +1 the above.

    When scanning negs with a flatbed scanner, I invert my light box and put it over the top of the negs. Keeps 'em flat, and ensures much better scans that don't need as much digital jiggery-pokery!
    Cheers,

    Jim.

  2. #12
    handle2001's Avatar
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    Based on the many excellent suggestions on this thread, I processed another roll at room temperature, which today happened to be 22°C. This roll came out much better I believe, and I was even able to get somewhat usable images out of two *very* overexposed frames where I was experimenting with long exposures. There are still weird black squiggles and lots of dust spots, but I'm pretty sure these are due to dust in the camera when the pictures were taken. I'm working on a roll of Delta 100 in my other camera which has given me flawless color pictures in the past, so hopefully that roll will be less blemished. Here's a sample:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    A word about my scanning process, as mentioned above I'm using an Epson Workforce 500 flatbed at 1200 DPI (the max it will do), placing the negatives on the bed, covering them with semi-gloss freezer paper, and then placing a iPad displaying all white on top of this. The results have been usable, as I'm only trying to digitize these photos to share with friends online. I'll make prints the old-fashioned way sometime in the future.

  3. #13
    handle2001's Avatar
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    A question, could all those spots and squiggles be from a dirty lens?

  4. #14
    winger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by handle2001 View Post
    A question, could all those spots and squiggles be from a dirty lens?
    They wouldn't be that sharp if they were on the lens.

  5. #15
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Do you have a loupe to check the negatives? If not a 50mm lens can work as well. See if the squiggles are on the film. My assumption is they are since they would be white if it was dust during scanning. The fact that they are sharp makes it look like dust on the film. Have you looked at the inside of the camera? is it clean? Are you using bulk loaded or factory loaded film?

  6. #16

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    I'm goin' with a dirty camera for the moment for the dust. As suggested, a good cleaning might help, but I would use compressed air or a rubber air blaster (be careful for liquid stuff being expelled). Lens off, mirror up, open the back, where the film is, etc. I do mine occasionally and never have this kind of dust.
    It's too hard from your postings to tell about exposure and development - I think you need to print on a normal (grade 2 - 3) paper and go from there. Your negs have to work in your darkroom with your chems, paper, and techniques (and to your taste). If you graze around this forum, you'll find a lot of information, and, as Bethe said, the Ilford site has a lot of "getting started" info.
    Also, Ken made good observations about the possible fog. Try another camera to eliminate this, and see if the rebate area is different.
    I would also recommend only one film and developer until things start getting predictable.

  7. #17
    handle2001's Avatar
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    I'm using factory loaded Ilford Delta 400. The camera looks clean inside, but can anyone recommend a safe cleaning method just in case?

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by handle2001 View Post
    Based on the many excellent suggestions on this thread, I processed another roll at room temperature, which today happened to be 22°C. This roll came out much better I believe, and I was even able to get somewhat usable images out of two *very* overexposed frames where I was experimenting with long exposures. There are still weird black squiggles and lots of dust spots, but I'm pretty sure these are due to dust in the camera when the pictures were taken. I'm working on a roll of Delta 100 in my other camera which has given me flawless color pictures in the past, so hopefully that roll will be less blemished. Here's a sample:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	bread2-scaled.jpg 
Views:	26 
Size:	445.5 KB 
ID:	65104

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	dock-scaled.jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	401.1 KB 
ID:	65105

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	mail-scaled-smudged.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	376.8 KB 
ID:	65106

    A word about my scanning process, as mentioned above I'm using an Epson Workforce 500 flatbed at 1200 DPI (the max it will do), placing the negatives on the bed, covering them with semi-gloss freezer paper, and then placing a iPad displaying all white on top of this. The results have been usable, as I'm only trying to digitize these photos to share with friends online. I'll make prints the old-fashioned way sometime in the future.
    I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if the dust and squiggles are due to your rather unorthodox scanning method.

    Try scanning the freezer paper with just some clear, unexposed film, and see what you get.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if the dust and squiggles are due to your rather unorthodox scanning method.

    Try scanning the freezer paper with just some clear, unexposed film, and see what you get.
    Agree. I'd try it without any film... then without the freezer paper...

    In my experience, traditional films look much grainier scanned with a flatbed (I use a Epson 1640) than printed.

  10. #20
    handle2001's Avatar
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    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	dirty scanner.jpg 
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ID:	65143

    Case closed. I don't have a loupe but examining the negatives against a light they looks much better than the scans would indicate. Again I'm not that upset since these are just destined for Facebook and Tumblr until I can get into a darkroom, but I'm glad to know it isn't a problem with my camera!

    Thanks for everyone's help and suggestions! I've now processed four rolls of film and am getting the hang of that part of it at least. This hobby is too much fun!

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