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  1. #1
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Question: Tips on how to use Ilford FP4+ roll film.

    Hi everyone,
    I'm a (mainly) Kodak Tri-X user. Since there where some (unfunded??) rumors that Tri-X might be discontinued somewhere in the future as well, I started to look for an other good B&W film, just in case. My other favorite was Agfa Scala, but that film IS discontinued already and my stock is getting low).
    Reading several discussions on the APUG forums, I decided to go for Ilford HP4+ film (125 ISO). I got me several rolls and want to test it with my Bronica SQ-B (6x6) and my Bronica RF 645 rangefinder (I love these cameras and the Bronica lenses).
    I'm planning to go out in a few weeks when the weather gets better and test these films.

    Before I do I would like to ask you - more experienced users of Ilford HP4+ - for your experiences, tips and tricks for making good (contrast) negatives.
    - is it really ASA 125? (under- or overexposing)
    - what about the contrast?
    - your preferred developer and times?
    - other interesting facts or experiences?

    Thanks,
    Bert
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bronica-SQB-0001.jpg   bronica-rf-645.jpg  
    Last edited by TheToadMen; 03-03-2013 at 07:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  2. #2

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    I'm assuming you mean FP4+. It is a wonderful, flexible film. It will work in a very wide variety of developers. Exposure index and contrast depend on your working methods and your preferences, so you'll have to test for yourself. Some people rate it at its ISO speed (125), some people prefer to rate it lower (100, 80, 64 etc). You'll have to decide for yourself based on testing and printing. I would suggest starting with a standard general purpose developer such as Ilford ID-11 (Kodak D-76).

    If you are used to shooting Tri-X you might prefer a faster film such as Ilford HP5+.

  3. #3

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    You probably mean FP4+; HP4 is an older film and any stock will be decades out of date. If you want a film to match the speed of Tri-X, HP5+ is a good choice.

    First I recommend that you read Ilford's spiel here: http://www.ilfordphoto.com/products/...26+White+Films

    I use mainly FP4+ and I can tell you that I get excellent results from it; it's very forgiving of exposure errors, especially overexposure. It's versatile and can be pushed to 400 ASA, or possibly higher. I find my exposures, metered with a hand-held Lunasix and exposed in my SQ-B and Yashica 124-G, and 35mm SLR, to be spot-on the 125 ASA / 22 DIN rated by Ilford - these guys make the film, they know what they're talking about! I don't faff around with 'personal film speed testing' - I'd rather take pictures! If exposed properly (meter and expose for shadows - film's exposure latitude is mostly in the area of over-exposure) the film can record a full range of shadow and highlight detail.

    I develop exclusively in Ilford ID-11, which gives fine grain and excellent sharpness. Unless you're printing billboards or photographing black cats in coal cellars I don't think you'll be disappointed by FP4+. I cannot comment on HP5+ since I haven't used it for a few years.

    Cheers,
    kevs
    testing...

  4. #4
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    You probably mean FP4+; HP4 is an older film and any stock will be decades out of date. If you want a film to match the speed of Tri-X, HP5+ is a good choice.
    Hi guys,
    Sorry for my typo. I did mean Ilford Fp4+ (not HP4+):
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I got the name mixed up wit HP5+. Sorry. It seems I cant edit the original post and title (??).
    I don't have a need to match up the ISO 400 of Tri-X. Fp4+ can be easily pushed to ISO 400 if needed. And it was my (uneducated) conclusion - based on many discussions and shown images - that I like the tonal range and contrast of FP4+ better than of HP5+. (Now, don't start a war here, mind you!!).
    I had to start somewhere, so I decided to try FP4+ first. So my original question should have been how do you use your Ilford FP4+ and how do you develop?

    There are two suggestions for Ilford ID-11 so far. I never used this developer. I started with Kodak D-76, but didn't like to work with powder. I switched to liquid Amaloco chemicals and had good results. Later I also tried Kodak T-MAX developer and Rodinal developer but haven't used it enough to have an opinion yet.
    Amaloco AM 74 is a local product (Holland, Europe) as a replacement for Agfa Rodinal.
    The paper developers from Amaloco are:
    - Agfa Neutol NE = Amaloco AM 2002 Extra Bromax
    - Agfa Neutol WA = Amaloco AM 1001
    - Agfa Multicontrast = Amaloco AM 2002 Extra Bromax
    - Agfa Neutol Plus = Amaloco AM 8008 Ecomax.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  5. #5
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Thread title corrected.

  6. #6
    cliveh's Avatar
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    FP4+ is a wonderful film. I recommend it without reservation. Try D76 at 1:1.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  7. #7

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    You said "I started with Kodak D-76, but didn't like to work with powder. "

    Have you thought about using Ilford Ilfosol 3? It comes in liquid and I really like it with Ilford films (and even Acros). FP4 is one of it's "most compatible films" if you believe the company line.

  8. #8

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    Ilford ID-11 is the same as D-76. If you do not like powders, Kodak's HC-110 is similar in working characteristics to D-76/ID-11. Ilford makes an excellent developer called DD-X, which again will give similar image characteristics to D-76 but with slightly higher film speed. You can also use the TMax developer you have (TMax RS if shooting sheet film). It too gives slightly higher film speed than D-76, but is slightly grainier. These are all standard solvent developers that will give you excellent image quality.

    Rodinal will be grainier, slightly sharper, and tends to give slightly lower film speed. It has it's own "look" which is prized by many. If you're shooting pinhole images I'd suggest one of the solvent developers listed above.

    You should also read Ilford's publication on FP4+ (available on Ilford's website).

    And be sure not to make decisions about any film/developer combination based on a few rolls or sheets of film. It takes time. And print the results.

  9. #9

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    I know you prefer not to mix dry chemicals but I'm in the chorus who sing praises to ID-11 or D-76. These identical general purpose developers are the baseline to compare if you experiment with another developer. Plus, they work well each and every time with FP-4+. If you change developer from the standard, it should be for a specific purpose. FP-4 has a shorter toe than Tri-X. I suggest shooting at EI 80 unless the light conditions are flat. In low contrast shoot at box speed and slight over development to increase brilliance.
    RJ

  10. #10
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Question: Tips on how to use Ilford FP4+ roll film.

    FP4+ is an awesome film but if its Tri-X you've been using HP5+ would be a more natural "replacement" if you're worried about Tri-X maybe going away.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

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