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  1. #11
    AgX
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    All british handbooks I got warn explicitely of using aluminium.

    On the other hand, aluminium has been used in ferrotyping, but to my knowledge fully laquered or anodized.

  2. #12

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    I'll try it and let you know the results

  3. #13
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    Sure Al is reactive and it will suffer badly if you left it in fixer for a week, so it's a bad idea to make any processing tools/containers out of it. But we're talking about 5 minutes of exposure here plus a bunch of very thorough washing, the metal will be totally fine.

    I'd be slightly worried about how you attach the paper to the Al and whether that involves trapping any chemistry that's difficult to wash out, e.g. if an edge is a little loose, could a bunch of fixer get trapped in there? And do you really want to be using spray adhesive with only a safelight? I suppose registration is not critical if you can guillotine the Al backing after processing to align with the print, but checking for bubbles & removing etc is going to be annoying in the dark. Normally when mounting a print, you're not really afraid to touch the front surface but if it's unexposed then most papers are very sensitive to skin-oils etc.

  4. #14

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    To Polyglot; You could 'spraymount' coat the aluminium-alloy sheet in the light though, surely? Then again, Bob mentioned using a heat-sensitive film (hence no out-gassing) so that might imply having a press inside the darkroom, while most people probably keep the dark-stuff in a different room from the mounting-stuff - not that I have a mounting-press, or large pieces of alloy sheet.

    One might suppose that there would be only half the surface of paper for the fixer to soak in to, as the alloy would cover the back, so that would leave just the baryta layer at the front face of the paper. If the paper is well sealed down (no unattached voids for chems or water to collect) then it sounds feasible indeed, although maybe a bit of overkill if it's just for getting a flat print!

  5. #15

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    Anodizing aluminum will not protect it from being attacked by either the alkali in developers nor the acid in stop baths and fixers. Aluminum is a very reactive metal and under the right conditions will even displace hydrogen from boiling water. Aluminum is usually protected by a thin oxide coating. Prevent that coating from forming say by forming a mercury amalgam on the surface and aluminum will react with water and other things. Sometimes quite violently as in the thermite reaction.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 03-03-2013 at 06:36 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16
    AgX
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    I guess polyglot got the right insight by dividing between tools and materials. We should not forget that photoplates are based on Aluminium (though anodized) too.

  7. #17

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    i think it is reinhold here on apug who
    uses aluminum foil to plate the silver out of his spent fixer.

    i'd mount the images after they have been fixed ..
    but that's just me ..

  8. #18

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    Mounting before processing risks stains and deterioration from chemicals retained in the mounting substance, and the print may buckle upon drying. If you use spray mount, how will you stop it going everywhere, including your fingers, the print surface, your negatives etc. can you spray and mount efficiently and cleanly in safelighting?

    Why not just get a proper flatbed dryer? They do a great job providing you keep the canvas free of chemicals. So do dry mounting presses. Or just accept your current arrangements as adequate.

    It's not something I'd recommend or try myself. Your mileage may vary, of course.
    Last edited by kevs; 03-03-2013 at 11:15 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: that was a bit mean really....
    testing...

  9. #19

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    Zishe, curious what the aluminum mount is all about vs. mounting board. I have not seen that before. Secondly, 30 seconds in a dry mount press does such a nice job flattening fiber paper. A used press is not very expensive, they come up on ebay. Lot's of complexity mounting in advance of printing. How do you deal with dry down for example?

  10. #20

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    It might be a good idea to note that there is a sticky on getting your fibre based paper to dry flat. That is found HERE.

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