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  1. #11

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    Depending on how many rolls you shoot, I would suggest you shoot at least one of each at box and develop at box but mark them so you have something to compare. The PanF+ is super fine so I don't see needing to shoot half speed and the shadow detail is already so good, but again you have a process I'm sure and if that works for you then good.

  2. #12
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    Stone: shooting at slower than box speed is more exposure and will give you thicker negs, not thin, unless you're reducing development far, far too much. It's the opposite of pushing. Shooting it at lower speed means you can reduce development and therefore tame the contrast a bit. Gives you a longer tonal scale and less risk of unprintable negs.

    Anyway, my typical Pan-F (EI25) development is 6:30 in Rodinal 1+50, rotary. What also looks good at EI25 is D76 1+3 (therefore no solvent action) for 14:00, traditional inversion development.

    Definitely agree that you should shoot, develop and print a test roll or two beforehand to make sure you have the process at least approximately dialed-in.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Stone: shooting at slower than box speed is more exposure and will give you thicker negs, not thin, unless you're reducing development far, far too much. It's the opposite of pushing. Shooting it at lower speed means you can reduce development and therefore tame the contrast a bit. Gives you a longer tonal scale and less risk of unprintable negs.

    Anyway, my typical Pan-F (EI25) development is 6:30 in Rodinal 1+50, rotary. What also looks good at EI25 is D76 1+3 (therefore no solvent action) for 14:00, traditional inversion development.

    Definitely agree that you should shoot, develop and print a test roll or two beforehand to make sure you have the process at least approximately dialed-in.
    Yea... I'm sorry I don't know why I said that... I know that, I'm just thinking backward today... I don't know what's wrong with me haha

  4. #14

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    Try the HC-100 at dilution H. Beautiful mid tones and it seems crisper than dilution B. I think the Acros in HC-110(h) would make beautiful portraits.
    - Bill Lynch

  5. #15

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    First of all, thanks to all of you for your helpful advice. Here's what I ended up doing.

    Film : Ilford Pan F+ 50 iso
    Shot as : 32 iso
    Developed in : Rodinal 1+100
    Time : 1 hour stand, 30 second initial inversions, 15 second inversions every 20 minutes

    I went for the stand development because at some point I did a polaroid test to check lighting on a pose and forgot to open my aperture back up (I was using Fuji FP-100C). In the end, looking at the frames side by side, I can tell when I messed up, but then again, they aren't meant to be viewed that way.
    Last edited by sbmphoto; 03-13-2013 at 09:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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