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  1. #41
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    One of those metal, screw top canisters? Just wash it out well with soap and water. I use Dr. Bronner's Castile. (It has a pH of about 9.)
    Rinse well and dry completely. Should be good to go.

    I've got about a dozen of those metal containers. That's how I got the gunk out of them after they had been sitting in a closet for decades.
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  2. #42
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    Vinegar smelling film

    Quote Originally Posted by Worker 11811 View Post
    One of those metal, screw top canisters? Just wash it out well with soap and water. I use Dr. Bronner's Castile. (It has a pH of about 9.)
    Rinse well and dry completely. Should be good to go.

    I've got about a dozen of those metal containers. That's how I got the gunk out of them after they had been sitting in a closet for decades.
    Oh man dr bronners really does wash everything! Haha damn hippies! Haha, I've certainly got some ill give it a try, for the heck of it I might give it a try washing some of the film with it and see how that works, wouldn't that be a hoot if it worked! Haha


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #43
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Dr. Bronner's was made long before the hippies latched onto it. It was first marketed as a Kosher product.
    I don't buy it because it's Kosher. I buy it because it's one of the few soaps that doesn't make my skin break out.
    Secondarily, it's useful for all kinds of other stuff.

    I wouldn't recommend it for washing film but, if you're up for some science experiments, what the hell?
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  4. #44

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    What about stored negatives?

    This thread has made me a bit nervous.
    I do not use very old film, but I have quite a number of negatives on Panatomic-X (and other b/w materials, all 35mm), exposed and developed during the late 70s, when I still went to school. Until now I always thought that I am safe from loosing them (in contrast to digital files) as long as I keep them dry and away from heat. Everywhere the long term stability of black and white film and its archival properties are praised.
    Now I am unsure what to do. Is it just a very small risk, more or less theoretical? Many people have 50 years old negatives, and do not report any troubles with them decomposing. Or are they just lucky? Is it advisable to take measures? It is a chemical reaction, so will be slowed down in low temperatures. But I can not store my negatives in a fridge. And of course I do not know what sort of film base was used for each of the different films I used.
    I would be very thankful for some advice that helps estimate the urgency/risk and reasonable precautions.
    And a big thank you anyways to PE for sharing his knowledge so readily.

    M. Hofmeister

  5. #45
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Vinegar smelling film

    Quote Originally Posted by mhofmeist View Post
    This thread has made me a bit nervous.
    I do not use very old film, but I have quite a number of negatives on Panatomic-X (and other b/w materials, all 35mm), exposed and developed during the late 70s, when I still went to school. Until now I always thought that I am safe from loosing them (in contrast to digital files) as long as I keep them dry and away from heat. Everywhere the long term stability of black and white film and its archival properties are praised.
    Now I am unsure what to do. Is it just a very small risk, more or less theoretical? Many people have 50 years old negatives, and do not report any troubles with them decomposing. Or are they just lucky? Is it advisable to take measures? It is a chemical reaction, so will be slowed down in low temperatures. But I can not store my negatives in a fridge. And of course I do not know what sort of film base was used for each of the different films I used.
    I would be very thankful for some advice that helps estimate the urgency/risk and reasonable precautions.
    And a big thank you anyways to PE for sharing his knowledge so readily.

    M. Hofmeister
    I would not worry so much, as long as its stored in cool and dry places with steady temperatures, it's fine and will last longer than you.

    This Panatomic-X was obviously stored in VERY POOR conditions, probably a hot humid garage or something like that.

    Don't be nervous your stuff is fine.

    On a side note, don't buy the Panatomic-X 70mm that's on eBay, since that's the stuff, he has a lot of it for something like $29.99+ shipping. I've emailed him about the issue but he hasn't responded nor pulled the posting :/ I feel bad for people who buy it.


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #46
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Goutiere View Post
    Is it possible for nitrate based films to spontaneously combust? I have seen how fast this stuff can burn!

    I think beyond the acid problem this is one thing I'd really be concerned about.
    Nitrate film is a concern but it's not that dangerous if handled properly. The biggest problem comes from people who don't know what they are dealing with.

    The decomposition of nitrate film is an exothermic reaction. It creates its own heat. When the heat builds up to a high enough level, that's when spontaneous combustion occurs. If you don't let the film get hot enough it won't ignite. The problems are twofold. The exact temperature at which nitrate film ignites isn't well understood. (Somewhere around the 100ºF mark.) Heat builds up slowly and film usually becomes "critical" when nobody is around to notice.

    The film isn't going to just burst into flames. It goes through several stages of decomposition first. It only self-ignites in the later stages. It can decompose all the way through the final stage without igniting but, once it gets past the beginning stages, it will be too far gone to be useful. By that time, you should have been able to address the problem before it becomes more dangerous.

    We're photographers and we're used to handling substances that are more toxic, flammable or dangerous than ordinary people so I have less worries about telling people here what I know about nitrate film. I have handled it but have never projected because it is illegal to project nitrate in a facility that is not specifically outfitted for the purpose. When I came across it, I set it aside and I took it out to the loading dock. Later, when nobody was around, I quietly took it away and got rid of it. Let's just say the film has been destroyed and leave it at that.
    (It was only a small roll, about 6 inches in dia.)

    If you come across nitrate film, segregate it and put it in a safe place where, if it catches fire, it won't do major damage. (Outside, away from buildings.) Then, at your first opportunity, have it destroyed. If the images are valuable, have it copied first.

    If you want to know more about nitrate film, check the following links:
    http://www.nationalmediamuseum.org.u...trateFilm.ashx
    http://motion.kodak.com/motion/Suppo...ge_nitrate.htm
    Randy S.

    In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

    -----

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/randystankey/

  7. #47

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    FWIW, I've a negs and slides from my Father and Grandfather, back to the 1940's. Apart from some fading on some early slides (which seems to be a known issue with some older brands of film, and could relate to less-than-optimal processing), they all seem fine. Storage has been in normal domestic conditions, no special archival precautions.

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