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  1. #21

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    Well written and well done! Yes, you definitely captured the anticipation of the first time...heck I still feel that wayl

  2. #22
    mr rusty's Avatar
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    I knew there was a trick to this. I know what I'm doing next time. Thanks.
    I've only just heard of this piece of card trick, and I'm going to give it a try, but having practised loading film straight on, I'm now fairly confident I can get the (120) film on the spool without any buckle marks every time. Sometimes it still takes a few attempts to get it started, but I'm getting better!. With a bit of practise you don't need bits of cardboard. 35mm is a doddle. Mind you, never tried a changing bag - it's much easier in a darkroom (except when you drop the film and it rolls away. Amazing how big a small darkroom can get when you are doing a fingertip search to find the pesky thing)

  3. #23

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    I just loaded my first roll of 120 film onto a reel the other day. I found it MUCH easier than 35mm! First, the roll is a lot shorter. Second, since its wound tighter, you don't get a slinky tangled mess if you drop the end. I just kept the lose end on my pinky and moved it in front of the reel while I was spooling to keep the film straight while it was going onto the reel. To get it onto the reel I just pinched the lead in my left hand and fed it into the tabs on the plastic reel by pulling, not pushing. So I was holding the reel with my right hand with the tabs facing right, and I "drew" the film across the reel. That way just felt more natural to me. I did fumble around for about 5 min. That beats the 30 min it took me the first time loading a roll of 35mm!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by edcculus View Post
    I just loaded my first roll of 120 film onto a reel the other day. I found it MUCH easier than 35mm! First, the roll is a lot shorter. Second, since its wound tighter, you don't get a slinky tangled mess if you drop the end. I just kept the lose end on my pinky and moved it in front of the reel while I was spooling to keep the film straight while it was going onto the reel. To get it onto the reel I just pinched the lead in my left hand and fed it into the tabs on the plastic reel by pulling, not pushing. So I was holding the reel with my right hand with the tabs facing right, and I "drew" the film across the reel. That way just felt more natural to me. I did fumble around for about 5 min. That beats the 30 min it took me the first time loading a roll of 35mm!
    I pull it into the reel too. With fingers holding the leading edge of the film, it's easy to make sure it goes in straight.

  5. #25

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    One point about adjusting over/under exposure when digitizing images. If you have a scanner with good software (like an epson) you can adjust the exposure when you scan it in...I think that works better than trying to change exposure on a jpeg in LR or Photoshop.

  6. #26
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    Ok, getting better at this. I shot a roll of 35mm Tri_X this time instead of 120. I found the 35mm much easier to load on a standard stainless steel reel rather than the fancy Paterson reel and tank that i have. Kodak Tri-X 72° 8 1/2 minutes in D76 1:1, stop bath, fixed for 5 minutes, and washed for 20 minutes and finished with photoflo. Here's one of the images. "Scanned" negative with a D70s and Prinz slide duplicator. Shot 4 frames and merged in PSE8 to copy the whole frame. Inverted, cropped the edges, and removed dust, coverted from RAW to JPEG, no other manipulation. There is some uneveness in the lighting that is from the "scanning" process i used.


    Kodak 35mm Tri-X2 by jmsnoopy650, on Flickr

  7. #27
    polyglot's Avatar
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    success!

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