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  1. #21
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    I just recently made the move from 35mm to MF myself. I have crimped the first frame of the first three rolls (and the only three) that I have developed while trying to get the "_______!!" end of the film in the "________!!" retaining clip! I could have had 4 or 5 35mm reels loaded in the time it takes me load one MF. I can say is that, for me, at the moment, it's a "reel" b___tch! But, all I have to do is look at that big giant 6x7 neg and everything is ok again!

    I share your pain.

    Chuck

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    Part of the trick, I think, is not to assume the retainer clip is in the center of the reel. Often, they will slide to one side. Even so, they will usually hold OK. Just make sure the film is centerd by feeling the stub end through the side openings of the center of the reel, and hold the film square to the reel. By keeping the fingers of your "feed hand" against the edge of the reel, you'll avoid getting too much curve going in. It almost jumps onto the reel that way.
    Great advice here, and another trick, when practicing loading in the dark, use your ears. The process should be silent. If you hear slight crackle you need stop and make sure the film does not have a buckle. Only takes a few times to get it right - but I have found the listening trick valuable.

    - Mike

  3. #23

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    I look at my hands, even though I can't see them

  4. #24

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    Try the Hewes Reels. They are significantly easier to load.

    FOr those using JOBO Processors, JOBO makes a special Hewes reel that uses the plastic cores on the 1500 series tanks. Makes life really easy.

  5. #25

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    All I'm going to say is -
    YIKES@!!!!!!!!

    Being that I am really getting annoyed at having crescent moons in my shots , I am following this post with interest. MF loading is a total PITA for me too. Some days I can load in under 10 secs and others it's like it just isn't gonna happen. (using plasic reel). Good idea about taking the first shot for 2-3 frames...

    Good luck, Jeanette.

  6. #26
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    Thanks Tammy! haha
    Help is on the way in the form of a fellow APUGer who has a greed to give me a hands on demo! Ah!
    I am such a visual learner (my daughter insists that I'm tad ADD) that written instructions usually take the form of "Now take the blah blah..." I try! Augh!!
    Thanks for the instructions and tips, and moral support!!
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  7. #27
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    I use both steel and plastic reels, for me, steel is harder to load with both, but easier for MF than 35mm. Something I would recommend looking into is the Arista premium plastic reels- I think they are actually Beseler, but sold by Freestyle under the Arista name. These have plastic "guides" that go across the reel to help "facilitate loading", I've never messed up a roll using these- and I'm pretty sure they are cheaper than almost any other reel.
    -Grant

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck1
    ...trying to get the "_______!!" end of the film in the "________!!" retaining clip!
    Chuck
    As disconcerting as it may sound, you must face up to
    a fact of life. Some manufacturers turn out lousy gear.

    I am, after many years, still under the impression that the
    Nikor SS tanks and reels were the first of that type marketed.
    Those tanks and reels were likely well made and with a little
    practice, easy to load.

    I've a Hewes and two Kindermann reels at my side as I
    type. The Hewes is of lighter gauge SS and uses a spring
    wire clip. The two Kindermanns are of heavier gauge. One
    uses a lift sheet spring and puncture and the other a slip
    in, wrap over and puncture, method of attachment.

    Those two brands are the only ones I can recommend. Dan

  9. #29

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    Loading Reels

    The way to learn the art of loading SS reels is with a 127 reel and a roll of Efke 100. If you can load that you can load anything.
    I have never been able to get one of these onto a plastic reel (which I often use)
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  10. #30
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    Oops. One other potential gremlin I forgot to mention earlier. When you're first placing the leading edge of the film under the retainer clip, some films, particularly those with a thin base, will tend to curl down, toward the emulstion side - rather like a towel draped lengthwise over a peg. That droop may cause the film to miss the throat of the loading spiral, and may cause a kink in the film as you proceed to load (one source of those niggly little half moons).

    The key is to be sure that you can feel both edges of the film through the center space of the reel. If not, you may need to reach underneach and lift the corners into place before you start to load - again, making sure the film is centered.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

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